Evert Everts Pels and Jannetje Simons

    Evert Everts Pels came from “Statijn”, which is believed to be Stettin, Pomerania[1]. Evert married Jannetje Sijmons 15 December 1641 in Amsterdam, North Holland, Netherlands. Jannetje was baptized 22 September 1624 in the Oudekerk (old Church), Amsterdam, North Holland, Netherlands, the daughter of Sijmon Floriszen and Claertje Arents.[2] She had four sisters, Lijsbet, Machtelt, Marij (who probably died young), and Marritje, and three brothers, Floris, Arent (who probably died young), and Arent. At the time of his marriage, Evert was a sailor.
    In 1642, Evert and Jannetje left for the Colony of Rensselaerwyck in New Netherland by the ship De Houttuyn, where Evert is listed as a beer brewer and apparently a freeman. Evert served this colony in this capacity as a brewer. In 1643, a Wolphert Nys bound himself for two years as a servant to the Pels family. In 1649, Evert bought property on the island of Manhattan and , in 1651, leased a farm on the North River. On 28 Nov 1651 and 21 May 1652, he was among those who took an oath of fidelity to the Patroon, Kiliaen Van Rensselaer. Evert is found in the records as the owner or skipper of a yacht. Evert freed Jannetje’s sister Marritje from her indenture (see information on the Jacob Barentsen Cool family) 19 February 1659. In 1678, it was written that Evert had also once lived on the Mill Creek in Greenbush.
    The Pels family later left Rensselaerwyck and settled in Wildwyck (later caller Kingston, Ulster, New York) . On 1 September 1659, Evert is reported as being a member of a scout party that attacked a group of Native Americans involved in a drunken brawl near Wildwyck. Evert was appointed as one of the first Schepens (magistrates) of this settlement in 1660. In 1662, his appointment as a commissary was continued by Peter Stuyvesant. In 1665, Evert was appointed a commissary of Kingston by the English Governor Richard Nicolls. Evert was again selected as a commissary in 1667. In 1669, Evert applied for and was granted the position of corn-measurer and watchman at the Rondout. He was reappointed to these positions in 1670.
    In between November of 1666 and February of 1667, there seems to have been some problems between Jannetje and her family and her sister Marritje and her family, as Jacob Barents Cool (Marritje’s husband) sued Evert in Jacob’s brother’s behalf for debt, then Evert sued Jacob for debt, and finally Marritje sued Jannetje for unpaid wages. In 1668, Jannetje was arrested for a debt to Jochem Ketelheym and Juriaen Westphael (then deceased), which Evert had neglected to pay, but the court found the arrest invalid.
    Evert had a small part in the transition of Esopus, New Netherland to Kingston, New York.[3] In 1664, the Governor Stuyvesant handed the colony over to the English. The English, eager to gain control, over the region sent troops to various areas, including Kingston. There were a number of abuses by these soldiers and great number of fights between them and the Dutch burghers. Finally, in 1667, Captain Broadhead arrested Cornelis Barentsen Slecht. The burghers felt that it had been done unjustly. Evert and Thomas Chambers were selected to ask the captain to release Slecht from arrest and go through the proper channels of the court to redress any offense. The captain refused and stated that he would be ready for anyone who tried to fetch Slecht from prison. This, among other grievances, lead to the Esopus Mutiny, in which the burghers openly rebelled against the soldiers.
    Later, during the summer of 1672, rumors reached Kingston that Dutch ships had arrived at New York City to retake the colony from the English. Evert was one of two men dispatched to investigate the truth of the rumor. They were indeed true and the colony of New York temporarily became a possession of the Netherlands once more.
    It was recorded that a son of Evert Pels was captured by Native Americans during the outbreak of the Second Esopus War (just prior to the surrender of New Netherland to the English). The son was adopted by and married into the tribe. He and his wife, who became pregnant, were unwilling to part. Unfortunately, I do not know the name of this son or of his wife.

Evert and Jannetje had:

1. Evert Evertsen Pels, married Brechtje Elswaerts 13 Aug 1670 in New Amsterdam, New Netherland.[4]
2. Maria Everts Pels[5], married Arien Allertsen Roosa.
3. Elisabet Evertssen Pels, born in Renselaerswyck, New Netherland, married Jochum Engelbartz van Namen[6] in 1676 in Kingston, Ulster, New York.
4. Sara Pels[7], born 3 Jul 1659, married Jacob Aertse 25 Feb 1677.
5. Claartje Eversen Pels[8], married Gerrit Aartsen.
6. Rabbeca Pels, baptized 13 Nov 1661 in Kingston, Ulster, New York.[9]
7. Symen Pels, baptized 29 Mar 1665 in Kingston, Ulster, New York, married Marritje Hendrix 1 Jan 1683 in Kingston, Ulster, New York.

Sources:
1. Huwelijks Aangifte (Marriage Intentions for all Dutch Reformed Churches in the City of Amsterdam), Film 113201, Vol. 475.
2. Huwelijken (Marriages in the Oudekerk, Amsterdam), Film 113353, Vol. 970.
3. Fiches collectie van dopen, trouwen en overlijden : 1553-1811 (Amsterdam, Noord Holland, Netherlands), Salt Lake City, UT:  Genealogical Society of Utah, 1964-1967, Films #441958, 441964, 441971, and 536908
4. Records of the Reformed Dutch Church in the City of New York: Marriages.
5. Hoes, Roswell Randall (comp.), Baptismal and Marriage Registers of the Old Dutch Church of Kingston, Ulster County, New York, Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1997 (originally published by De Vinne Press (New York), 1891).
6. O’Callaghan, E.B., The History of New Netherland, or New York under the Dutch, Vol. I, New York:  D. Appleton & Co., 1855, pgs. 451-454
7. Van Laer, Arnold J. F. (trans.), New York Historical Manuscripts:  Dutch, Vol. II (Register of the Provincial Secretary, 1642-1647), Baltimore, MD:  Genealogical Publishing Co., 1974.
8. Van Laer, Arnold J. F. (trans.), New York Historical Manuscripts:  Dutch, Vol. III (Register of the Provincial Secretary, 1648-1660), Baltimore, MD:  Genealogical Publishing Co., 1974.
9. Van Laer, Arnold J. F. (trans.), New York Historical Manuscripts:  Dutch, Vol. IV (Council Minutes, 1638-1649), Baltimore, MD:  Genealogical Publishing Co., 1974
10. E.B. O'Callaghan, The History of New Netherland, or New York under the Dutch, Vol. II, New York:  D. Appleton & Co., 1848, pg. 176
11. Venema, Janny, (ed.), Deacons’ Accounts, 1652-1674, First Dutch Reformed Church of Beverwyck/Albany, New York, Rockport, ME:  Picton Press, 1998.
12. Fernow, Berthold (ed.), Records of New Amsterdam from 1653 to 1674 Anno Domini, Vol. I, Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1976.
13. Early Church Records, Ulster County, New York, p. 19.
14. Van Laer, A.J.F. (trans. & ed.), Minutes of the Court of Fort Orange and Beverwyck, 1652-1656, Vol. II, Albany: University of the State of New York, 1923.
15. O’Callahan, E. B. (comp.), Laws and Ordinances of New Netherland, 1638-1674, 1868.
16. O’Callaghan, E.B., The Documentary History of the State of New York, Vol. IV, Albany:  Charles Van Benthuysen, 1851.
17. O’Callaghan, E.B., The History of New Netherland, or New York under the Dutch, Vol. I, NY:  D. Appleton & Co., 1855.
18. O’Callaghan, E.B., History of New Netherland; or, New York under the Dutch, Vol. II, New York:  D. Appleton & Co., 1855.
19. Versteeg, Dingman (trans.), New York Historical Manuscripts: Dutch, Kingston Papers, 2 vols., translated 1899, revised by Samuel Oppenheim 1912, and reprinted by Baltimore, MD:  Clearfield Co., 1999.
20. Christoph, Peter R., New York Historical Manuscripts:  English, Vol. XXII (Administrative Papers of Governor Richard Nicolls and Francis Lovelace, 1664-1673), Baltimore, MD, Genealogical Publishing Co., 1980.
21. Van Wagenen Family Bible, submitted by Patricia Van Wagenen Heffernan of Canton, GA, http://www.biblerecords.com/vanwagenen.html.


From the Index of Amsterdam Baptisms, Marriages, and Burials
LDS FHL Film #441964

1624 Sept. 22
Vader:  Florisz Sijmon
Moeder:  Arents Klaer
Kind:  Jannetjen
Bijzonderh.:  Ber. broekenmaker
Kerk:  O.K. Nr. 6 Blz. 94

Source:  Fiches collectie van dopen, trouwen en overlijden : 1553-1811 (Amsterdam, Noord Holland, Netherlands), Salt Lake City, UT:  Genealogical Society of Utah, 1964-1967.


Compareerden als voren Evert Everts Pels van Statijn varensgezel out 25 jaren wonende in de Hasselaersteeg, geen ouders, geassisteert met zijn oom Pieter Smit, en Jannetje Sijmonsdr. out 18 jaren wonende als voren geassisteert met haer moeder Claertje. Den 31 November 1641.
Appeared as before Evert Everts Pels from Statijn, sailor, aged 25 years, living in the Hasselaersteeg, having no parents (living in Amsterdam), accompanied by his uncle Pieter Smit, and Jannetje Sijmon’s daughter, aged 18 years, living in the same place, accompanied by her mother Claertje. 31 November 1641.

Source:  Huwelijks Aangifte (Marriage Intentions for all Dutch Reformed Churches in the City of Amsterdam), Film 113201, Vol. 475.


De 15th Dito heft D. Holbekijus getrout als volgt:  Evert Everts Pels met Jannetje Sijmons.
The 15th of the same (December 1641) Dominie Holbekijus married as before:  Evert Everts Pels with Jannetje Sijmons.

Source:  Huwelijken (Marriages in the Oudekerk, Amsterdam), Film 113353, Vol. 970.


Records of the Reformed Dutch Church in New Amsterdam/New York Marriages

1670
13 August. Evert Evertszen Pels, j. m. Van N. Albanien, en Brechtje Elswaerts, j. d. Van Amsterdam.

Source:  Records of the Reformed Dutch Church in the City of New York: Marriages.


Records of Baptisms of the Reformed Church at Kingston, Ulster, NY.

Page # Baptism # Baptism Date Parents Child Witnesses
2 10 1661
13 Nov
Evert Pels
Jannetje Symens
Rabecca D° Gideon Schaets.
Annetje Schaets.
4 55 1665
29 March
Evert Pels
 Jannetje Symens
Symen Toomes Chamers.
Margriet Chamers.
Gysbert van Imbroeck.

Kingston Marriage Register.

Page 503    #33  1676  (Date of marriage not given.)
JOCH ENGELBART, and ELISABET EVERTSEN PELSS, born in the Colony of Renselaerswyck. Date of Banns not given.

Page 506    #58  1683  1 Jan.
SIMON PELS, j. m., of Kingston, and resid. there, and MARITIE HENDRIX, j. d., of Kingston, and resid. there. First publication of Banns, 17 Dec., 1682.

Source: Hoes, Roswell Randall (comp.), Baptismal and Marriage Registers of the Old Dutch Church of Kingston, Ulster County, New York, Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1997 (originally published by De Vinne Press (New York), 1891).


Memorandum for Dominie Johannes Megapolensis,
this 3d June, 1642, proceeding to the Colonie by the ship De Houttuyn, skipper Adriaen Dircksen Houttuyn.
(From the Rensselaerswyck MSS.)

    His Reverence will be pleased to take charge of my people and property, which are at present conveyed over in God's name, in the ship De Houttuyn. The persons going over will be these:
De. Johannes Megapolensis,                              Johan Carsterssen, van Barltt, N. Brabant,
Matheld Willemsen, his wife,                              Jeuriach Bestvaell, van Luydendorp,
Hellegond, Dirrick, John, and Samuel, his          Claes Jansen, van Waalwyck, N. Brabant,
            children,                                                Paulus Jansen, van Geertruydenburg, do.
Abraham, Staes, surgeon,                                  Hans Vos van Baden.
            his servant,                                            Juriaen van Sleswyck, N. Brabant,
Evert Pels, beer-brewer,                                   Hendrick Albertsen van
            his wife,                                                         Wuden, 29 years old,    }
            his man,                                                Gertrude Dries, his wife,         }
Cornelis Lamberssen, van Doom, Utrecht,                  23 years old,                }    From
            farm servant,                                         Hendrick Dries, her brother,  }    Driesburg.
Jochim Kettelhuer, van Cremyn,                                 21 years,                      }
Johan Helms, van Barltt, N. Brabant,

    It is to be remembered that this Hendrick Albertz, for his three; Abraham Staes, for his two; Evert Pels, for his three, must pay the skipper Adriaen Dircksen for their board, in the same manner as all the other freemen. But the farm-servants are to come at my expense.
    N. B The book-keeper in the colonie shall usually observe that the expense of the board of the freemen must be charged to their account, as Director Kieft sometimes places it under one head, altogether to the charge of the Patroon. He shall take care that these persons embark on ship-board, and having arrived, by God's help, at the Manhattans, where the Noble Director Kieft resides, obtain that they, and my goods, be forwarded to the colonie by the first opportunity, and provided with food at my expense, and according to my cordial salutations to the Honorable Director Kieft, which shall be followed…
    …As the church, the minister's house, that of the officer, and, moreover, of all the trades-people, [ambachten,] must henceforward be established there, as Abraham Staes and Evert Pels, the brewer, have undertaken, I am entirely willing, and consent that, with the exception of the farmers and tobacco-planters, who must reside at their farms and plantations, no other tradesman, henceforward and after the expiration of their service, shall establish themselves elsewhere than in the church vicinage, in the order and according to the plan of building sent herewith; for every one residing where he thinks fit, separated far from others, would be, unfortunately, in danger of their lives, in the same manner as sorrowful experience has taught, around the Manhattans, of all which the commissary, Arendt van Curler, shall give notice to all persons, being called together, so that they may regulate themselves accordingly…
    The goods which are sent over at present by this ship, are packed as follows and marked as in the margin.
    Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, are 4 large barrels containing two lasts, 11 muds of malt for brewing, for Evert Pels, on condition of reimbursing me according to contract…

Source:  O’Callaghan, E.B., The History of New Netherland, or New York under the Dutch, Vol. I, New York:  D. Appleton & Co., 1855, pgs. 451-454


Page 137, No. 60b

Note of Evert Pels in favor of Jan Jansen Damen
 I, the undersigned Evert Pels, residing in Renselaerswyck, promise for myself, my heirs and successors that I will honestly satisfy and pay to Jan Jansen Damen the sum of one hundred and ninety guilders, nineteen stivers, ten pence, which money the aforesaid Jan Damen has paid on my account to the company for Wolphert Nys. I promise to pay same on demand. Done the 15th of June Ao. 1643, in Fort Amsterdam, New Netherland.
Evert Pels

Page 138, No. 61a

Contract of Wolphert Nys to serve Evert Pels and his wife for two years
 I, Wolphert Nys, from the bishopric of Vol,[10] hereby acknowledge that I have of my own free will and deliberate choice bound and hired myself to Evert Pels and his wife, residing in Renselaerswyck, for the term of two consecutive years, commencing on the date hereof. He, Wolphert Nys, promises while in the service of the aforesaid Evert Pels to demean and conduct himself diligently, honestly and faithfully as a faithful, honest and decent servant is bound and ought to serve his master and mistress, and that in such work and employment as Evert Pels shall please to command; for which honest and upright service he shall annually have and receive wages the sum of one hundred and fifteen guilders, whereupon I have already received from the above mentioned Evert Pels the sum of one hundred and ninety guilders, nineteen stivers, ten pennies, which he shall deduct from my first earned wages. In testimony whereof this is signed by Wolphert Nys in presence of the witness. Done the 15th of June Ao. 1643.
This is the X mark of Wolphert Nys
Adriaen van Tienhoven, witness
            Acknowledged before me,
Cornelis van Tienhoven, Secretary

Source:  Van Laer, Arnold J. F. (trans.), New York Historical Manuscripts:  Dutch, Vol. II (Register of the Provincial Secretary, 1642-1647), Baltimore, MD:  Genealogical Publishing Co., 1974.


Pages 112-3, No. 39e

Deed from Adriaen Keyser to Evert Pels of the lot formerly belonging to Harmen Meyndertsen van den Bogaert
    Before me, Cornelis van Tienhoven, secretary of New Netherland, residing in Fort Amsterdam, appeared Adriaen Keyser, commissary for the Wet India Company in New Netherland, who by virtue of the deed executed on the 8th of July 1649 by the honorable director of New Netherland transfers, conveys and makes over to Evert Pels a lot situated on the island of Manhatans, between the lots of Oloff Stevensz and Adam Roelantsen, in true and absolute ownership, to be used and disposed of by the said Evert Pels as he might use and dispose of his lawful and patrimonial lands and property, without the grantor retaining any right of ownership thereof and therefore relinquishing the same forever. This is signed without fraud by Adriaen Keyser in the presence of the undersigned witnesses, the 8th of July Ao. 1649, in New Amsterdam, New Netherland.
A. Keyser
     I, the undersigned, acknowledge the receipt from Evert Pels of the sum of one hundred Carolus guilders in part payment of the above mentioned lot. Manhat., this 18th of July Ao. 1649.
A. Keyser

Pages 313-6, No. 97

Lease from agents of Anna Jans Bogardus to Evert Pels of a farm on the North river
     On this day, date underwritten, before me, Cornelis van Tienhoven, secretary of New Netherland, appeared Govert Loockmans, Hans Kirsteede and Piter Hartgers, acting as agents for Anna Bogardus, widow of Everardus Bogardus, deceased, of the first part, and Evert Pels, of the second part, who acknowledged that in all love and friendship they had made and concluded the following lease, in the manner hereinafter written. The said Govert Loockmans, Hans Kirsteede and Piter Hartgers, all relatives by marriage of the aforesaid widow and in their capacity of agents of the said Anna Bogardus, declare that deliberately and for her account they have leased to Evert Pels the farm situated on the North river, heretofore used by Egbert Woutersz, as large and as small as the land cultivated by him may be. It is expressly stipulated that the term of the lease shall begin on the first of May anno 1652 and end on the first of May anno 1654. The lessors are bound to deliver with the farm two mares, one filly, a one-year old stallion, two milch cows, and one heifer with calf, all sound and able, which animals, having been delivered, shall be at the common risk of the lessors and the lessee, so that the lessee at the expiration of the term of the lease shall be bound to restore the number of animals received, both as to quantity and quality, to the lessors, and the increase which by God’s blessing shall then be found to have been bred from the animals the parties shall divide half and half, it being understood that the number of animals first delivered by the lessors shall first be deducted and received by them. Furthermore, if it should happen, which God prevent, that during the term of the lease one or more horses or cows came to die and the increase were not sufficient to restore the number of cattle received complete as to quantity and quality, the lessee and the lessors shall each bear half the loss of the cattle that died and he lessee not be obliged to make compensation for more than the half thereof. Furthermore, there shall be delivered with the farm two plowshares. For rent of the said farm house and dwelling house and the land that heretofore has been used in connection with it, Evert Pels shall yearly on the first day of May anno 1653 pay the sum of two hundred and twenty-five guilders and thirty pounds of butter for hire of the cows annually.
    The lessee shall have the choice to build a house on the aforesaid land, which house and everything pertaining to it shall be at the expense, upkeep and risk of the lessee, and  at the expiration of the lease the lessors shall be bound to take over the house and pay the lessee according to appraisal by impartial persons and both parties shall be content therewith. It is also stipulated that the lessee is bound at his expense to put a new roof on the present house and keep the roof-tight, for which he may deduct the first year’s rent, except the 30 pounds of butter, which the lessee shall pay the first year without anything more and without being bound afterwards to pay the rent of the year 1652; and for his trouble and the disbursement of money needed for the new house, the lessee shall, when he undertakes to do that, yearly be entitled to deduct from his promised rent one hundred and twenty-five guilders, which at the expiration of the lease shall avail the lessors in payment for the dwelling house which Pels shall have built, so that in such case the lessee remains bound to pay one hundred guilders and the 30 pounds of butter during the remaining five years.
    The lessee promises and agrees at his expense to fence in and keep tight the land in the way that is best and most profitable to him and at the expiration of the lease, which will be on the first May anno 1658, the deliver up the land tightly and substantially fenced off for cattle.
    The lessee shall be held properly to seed the land with good grain and in the year 1658 to deliver the same seeded to the lessors, provided that the lessee shall be paid therefor by the lessors as much as impartial persons shall appraise the grain which shall stand in the field. The lessee shall during the term of the lease also have use of the valley near Dominee’s hoeck, to cut hay.
    Which contract we on both sides hereby confirm by these our signatures in the presence of Johanes Chisman and Adriaen van Tienhoven, as witnesses hereto invited, this day, the first of November anno 1651, at New Amsterdam in New Netherland.
Govert Loockermans
Pieter Hertgers
Hans Kiersteede
Evert Pels
Andreas Johannis Christman
           Acknowledged before me,
Cornelis van Tienhoven, Secretary

Source:  Van Laer, Arnold J. F. (trans.), New York Historical Manuscripts:  Dutch, Vol. III (Register of the Provincial Secretary, 1648-1660), Baltimore, MD:  Genealogical Publishing Co., 1974.


Page 312, No. 254, 31 May 1646
     Jan Damen, plaintiff, vs. Evert Pels, defendant, about freight of 76 schepels of wheat. It is decided that the plaintiff is to receive the grain free of charge at the Manhatans.

Source:  Van Laer, Arnold J. F. (trans.), New York Historical Manuscripts:  Dutch, Vol. IV (Council Minutes, 1638-1649), Baltimore, MD:  Genealogical Publishing Co., 1974


List of people who took the Oath of Fidelity to the Patroon on 28 November 1651 in Rensselaerswyck

…Evert Pels…

Source:  E.B. O'Callaghan, The History of New Netherland, or New York under the Dutch, Vol. II, New York:  D. Appleton & Co., 1848, pg. 176.



Page 12
March [1654]…
23 ditto received from Evert Pels, as alms, 2 pieces of eight………………………f6.—

Page 70
Ady in Beverwijck 1660
April disbursements of the deaconry
1 ditto given to Jacob, Evert Pels’s brother-in-law, some butter and meat and bacon

Page 83
Disbursements in May [1661]
4 ditto given 62 guilders in strung sewant to Evert Pels’s wife on the condition that she will pay it back…………………………………………………………………… f62.11

Source:  Venema, Janny, (ed.), Deacons’ Accounts, 1652-1674, First Dutch Reformed Church of Beverwyck/Albany, New York, Rockport, ME:  Picton Press, 1998.


    Under the Court Minutes for 5 July 1655, page 328:  “Matys Capito, pltf. v/s Evert Pels, deft. Pltf. demands, that deft. be condemned to pay the gl. 37, which Gerrit Segers owed him, when he was engaged to go to Fort Orange to serve deft. who was then to pay him. Deft. does not deny, that he promised to pay the money for Gerrit Segers, if he had earned it from him, but that on the contrary he was in his employ only 14 days, and owes himself full 20 gl. and therefore maintains, that he is not bound to pay for Segers. Parties being heard, the Court decides, that, inasmuch as the bail was conditional and it does not appear, that Gerrit Segers earned any of the demanded money from the deft., pltf. has no claim in this matter on Evert Pels. Therefore his action is dismissed saving his claim against Gerrit Segers.”
     Also, on page 329 (1655):  “Jan Cornelis Clyn, ptlf. v/s Evert Pels, deft. Case of attachment. Ptlf. demands payment of fl. 50, for wage earned at deft’s house, which he promised to pay on eight days since expired. Deft. denies being indebted to pltf., as he had discharged by an assignment the claim of fl. 50. offers still pay the said fl. 50. on condition of receiving back his executed assignment. Parties being heard the Court decides, inasmuch as pltf. has accepted the assignment and granted an acquittance thereupon, that he must wait until the same, being accepted, is paid, or until the same be refused payment. Wherefore the arrest is declared invalid.”

Source: Court Minutes of New Amsterdam, from Fernow, Berthold (ed.), Records of New Amsterdam from 1653 to 1674 Anno Domini, Vol. I, Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1976.


Power of Attorney
19 February 1659

“Power of Attorney from Evert Pels to Jan Jacobsen

Appeared before me, Johannes La Montagne, in the service of the General Chartered West India Company Commissary at Fort Orange, and the village of Beverwyck, Evert Pels, who declared in the presence of the herinafter named witnesses, that he hath constituted and appointed, as hereby does constitute and appoint, the Honorable Captain Jan Jacobsen his attorney, in the principle's name and in his behalf, to procure the freedom of MARRETJE SYMONS, sister of the Principle's wife, dwelling in the city of New Amstel, on the South River, with one Pieter Pietersen Harder, in such manner as the attorney may adjudge best; promising to hold good and valid whatever the attorney shall do in this matter, as if he, the principle, were himself present, for which he binds his person and estate, real and personal, submitting the same to all courts and judges.

Done in Fort Orange the 19th of February, anno 1659, in the presence of Johannes Prevost and Jan Pietersen Muller.

Signed EVERT PELS; Witnesses : Johannes Provoost and Jan Pieters; acknowledged before me La Montagne, Commissary at Ft. Orange.”

Source:  Early Church Records, Ulster County, New York, p. 19.


Page 155-156, 3 Sep 1658[11]
The honorable officer, plaintiff, against Christoffel Davids, defendant.
The plaintiff says that an affidavit from the Esopus has been handed to him, according to which the defendant, coming from the Manhatans in the yacht of Evert Pels and while being in the Highlands, said to two savages who came on board that the Sachem, to wit, the honorable general, had killed the savages at the Manhatans and that the following night he would come to the Esopus and there also break the necks of the savages, whereupon the savages of the Esopus took some Christian prisoners and created great outrages.
The honorable plaintiff therefore requests that the defendant be examined upon interrogation…

Page 205, 15 Jul 1659
Evert Pels, plaintiff, against Jan Martensen, defendant.
 The plaintiff demands of the defendant 20 beavers by balance of accounts, arising from the purchase of 5 aams of brandy.
 The defendant denies having received 5 aams, but admits having received 4, for which 5 beavers are still due to the plaintiff.
 The honorable court, having heard the parties on both sides, orders the defendant to pay the plaintiff the 5 beavers which he acknowledges being due. As to the remaining 15 beavers claimed by the plaintiff, the plaintiff is to swear to his book and if he refuses the defendant is to do the same on the next court day.

Page 210, 9 Sep 1659
Evert Pels, plaintiff, against Jan Martensen, defendant.
 The plaintiff demands from the defendant 20 beavers by balance of accounts arising from the purchase of 5 aams of brandy, in regard to which judgment was put off on the last court day, being the 15th of July, until the next court day. Whereas the defendant denies having received 5 aams of brandy, but admits that he received 4 aams, it is requested that the case be put over to the next court day, to be decided by the oath of the parties, the plaintiff to have the preference and upon his refusal (to take the oath), the privilege of taking the oath to be extended to the defendant.

Page 220, (7 Oct?) 1659
 The wife of Evert Pels, plaintiff, against the wife of Jan Martensen, defendant.
 The plaintiff demands payment of 20 whole beavers, due by balance of account for 5 aams of brandy, as may be seen by the minutes of the preceding court day, being the 9th of September when the parties for the second time were given time to confirm their testimony upon oath. Now, upon the oath of the plaintiff, the defendant is condemned to pay the plaintiff the 20 beavers demanded within the space of six weeks, on pain of execution.

Source:  Van Laer, A.J.F. (trans. & ed.), Minutes of the Court of Fort Orange and Beverwyck, 1652-1656, Vol. II, Albany: University of the State of New York, 1923.


Page 396
    In an ordinance of the Director General (Petrus Stuyvesant) and Council of New Netherland for the erection of a Court of Justice at Wildwyck, 16 May 1661:
     “…In order that all things there may be performed with proper order and respect, it is necessary to choose, as Judges, honest, intelligent persons, owners of real estate, who are lovers of peace and well affected subjects of their Lords and Patroons, and of their Supreme government established here, promoters and professors of the Reformed Religion, as it is at present taught in the Churches of the United Netherlands, in conformity to the Word of God, and the order of the Synod of Dordrecht. Which Court of Justice, for the present time, until it shall be herein otherwise Ordained by the said Lords, Patroons, or their Deputy, shall consist of one Schout…and with him, of three Schepens, to which office are, for the present time and ensuing year, commencing the last of next May, elected, and on having taken the Oath, are confirmed by the Director General and Council, Evert Pels, Cornelis Barentsen Sleght and Elbert Heymans Rose…”

Page 414

The Kingston (Wiltwyck/Esopus) Tax List
(to defray the cost of building the Dominie’s house),
12 November 1661
…Evert Pels, his bouwery, 36 morgens…90 florins…

Page 420
    In an ordinance for the construction of a new road at Esopus, passed 22 November 1661, it states, “…after diverse debates respecting the survey and construction if a proper Road from here to the new and still undivided lands, it is judged best and most proper that the road to said Lands shall pass over the Land of Evert Pels…”

Source:  O’Callahan, E. B. (comp.), Laws and Ordinances of New Netherland, 1638-1674, 1868.


Excerpts from the Journal of the Second Esopus War,
By Capt. Martin Kregier, 1663.
Translated from the original Dutch MS

Page 54, 12 Oct 1663
12th ditto. Two parties were again in the field with the ploughmen. About noon, to day, Reyntje Pieters came from fort Orange with his yacht in which also arrived Thomas Chambers and Evert Pels. Brought news that Peter the Fleming, residing on the East shore opposite Bethlehem had been warned by a Mohawk to depart if he wish not to be killed, for he said that all the Indians on the East side of fort Orange river had assembled and were to come in five days to attack fort Orange. This Indian had given him this warning, he being his great Nytapt[12] and the Mahicanders and the Cattskill Indians had all abandoned their maize plantations; yea; had offered to sell divers maize plantations to the Dutch for a piece of cloth. Peter the Fleming brought this news to Fort Orange on Monday, being the 7th of October, the day before he left fort Orange with the yacht. Now, the result hereof time will determine. I also received a letter from Cattskill, from Elbert Herbertsen which I enclose to your Honors. It is dated 26th September. In like manner Capt Thomas Chambers informs me that many of the Dutch of Fort Orange are removing in canoes the corn from the Indians' plantations which had been abandoned by the Indians. This Mohawk had also said that five Indian Nations had assembled together; namely the Mahicanders, the Catskills, the Wappingers, those of Esopus besides another tribe of Indians that dwell half way between Fort Orange and Hartford. Now, time will tell what there is herein. He said their place of meeting was on the east side of the fort Orange river, about three miles inland from Claverack, and that they were about five hundred strong. Sent two escorts to the river side to fetch up the Honble Company's goods. They returned to Wildwyck together with the detachments that had been out in the field with the ploughmen. Saw nothing.

Page 60, 1 Dec 1663
3d ditto. The military Council having met, the following resolution was adopted: —
“Ensign Christiaen Niessen proposes to send down, pursuant to despatches from the Honble Director General and Council, the saddles, pistols, holsters & carbines, the best whereof was left by Capt. Lieutenant Martin Cregier and remains with the Clerk, Mattheus Capito, as appears also by letters from the Capt. Lieutenant aforesaid together with the three metal guns and their accoutrements as they were used in the field, and also one sail.
“The Military Council decided that it was impossible, in view of the approaching winter, to send the articles down at present as here at Wildwyck we have no smith sufficiently expert to repair the arms, and as the Wappingers come almost daily under pretence of exchanging Christians, to spy out this place which already hath suffered massacre enough, and consequently, if the articles in readiness were sent away (which would be publicly seen by other tribes of Indians) two massacres  (which God forbid!) may occur through want of all adequate means, save God's Providence.
“2ndly. The Ensign aforesaid moves, inasmuch as the setting out of the palisades is found as yet to be for the greater part inadequate and not in accordance with the Capt. Lieutenant's request, and as in many places palisades have been removed from the curtains and not replaced by others, much less attention paid to setting out the same, to the imminent ruin and destruction of this Village of Wildwyck, which God forfend; and demands further that the inhabitants of Wildwyck may be notified by the W. Court to put the fort in a suitable state of defence within tile space of three days, and in default or neglect thereof, that he do it with the best means he may at present find at hand, and demand repayment therefor when done, from the W. Court at Wildwyck.
“The Military Council unanimously resolved that for the due execution of' said proposal, it be forthwith communicated to the Court in Wildwyck, and that they answer the same without delay. (Signed) THOMAS CHAMBERS, HENDRICK JOCHEMS, JAN PEERSEN, EVERT PELS, JONAS RANTSOU, WALRAN DU MOND, ANTONIE DELAVA.”

Source:  O’Callaghan, E.B., The Documentary History of the State of New York, Vol. IV, Albany:  Charles Van Benthuysen, 1851.


Page 125
    From “a letter from Jan Baptist to Nicolaus van Rensselaer, dated London, l6/26 June, 1678”
…Petanoek, the Mill Creek—the creek where Evert Pels did live in Greenbush, (in't greene bosch)…

Source:  O’Callaghan, E.B., The History of New Netherland, or New York under the Dutch, Vol. I, NY:  D. Appleton & Co., 1855.


Page 176, 28 Nov 1651

FORM OF OATH TAKEN BY THE COLONISTS OF RENSSELAERSWYCK TO THE PATROON.
“I, N. N., promise and swear that I shall be true and faithful to the noble Patroon and Co-directors, or those who represent them here, and to the Hon'ble Director, Commissioners and Council, subjecting myself to the Court of the Colonie; and I promise to demean myself as a good and faithful inhabitant or Burgher, without exciting any opposition, tumult or noise; but on the contrary, as a loyal Inhabitant, to maintain and support offensively and defensively, against every one, the Right and Jurisdiction of the Colonie. And with reverence and fear of the Lord, and uplifting of both the first fingers of the right hand, I say so TRULY HELP ME GOD ALMIGHTY."
This date, 15th July, 1649, hath Steven Jansen Carpenter taken the Oath of allegiance from the hands of the Honorable Director before the commissioners of the colonie. Witness, A. DE HOOGES, Secretary.
23d Nov., 1651. RESOLVED, that all Householders and Freemen of this Colonie shall appear on the 28th day of November of this year, being Tuesday, at the house of the Honorable Director, and there take the Burgerlyke oath of Allegiance.
The following persons have taken the Oath at the appointed time, according to the foregoing formulary:
… Evert Pels…
[21st May, 1652. Renss. MSS.]

Page 394-6, 1 Sep 1659
It was whilst this bad understanding existed that the news arrived of the murders committed at Mespath. Rumors that the Esopus savages were busy night and day, preparing- bows and arrows, now became rife, and every man's mind was again agitated by terrors of its own creation. Under such circumstances but little was required to bring about a collision, and as trouble is always at hand: when looked for, that little was not long wanting. A few Indians, some eight in number, were employed by Thomas Chambers,' one of the settlers, till late in the evening, shelling or husking corn. At the termination of their work, they asked for brandy, a bottle of which, was imprudently furnished. With this the party now withdrew to within a short distance of the fort, where they sat down and indulged in their excesses until midnight. Excited by the liquor, they now “began making a terrible noise,” and having some wampum, they determined on purchasing an additional supply of drink. They succeeded, unfortunately, in obtaining a present of another bottle from a Dutch soldier, and they again renewed their carousal; but the bottle had scarce made one round when they commenced pulling each other's hair. At this stage of the debauch, a drunken savage discharged his gun loaded, however, only with powder. Now one of the party proposed adjourning. “He felt some sensation in his body as if they should all be killed.” He was jeered for his alarm. “Who'd kill us? We never harmed the Dutch. Why should they kill us?” This, however, did not appease his fears. “My heart feels heavy within me, my heart is full of fear,” he replied, as he again entreated his companions to leave the place. And well it, might. The crackling of the underwood told but too plainly the approach of danger. For whilst these heedless fools were thus destroying their reason, the Dutch in the fort became alarmed by the hideous noises which disturbed the silence of the night. Forthwith, the sergeant of the guard was ordered out to reconnoitre, and on reporting at his return that the disturbance proceeded from some drunken savages, Jacob Jansen Stol called on several of the people to follow him in a sortie against them. Contrary to the orders of Ensign Smith, he left the fort accompanied by Jacob Jansen van Stoutenbergh, Thomas Higgins, Gysbert Phillipsen van Benthuysen, Evert Pels, Jan Arentsen, and Barent Harmensen, and attacked the savages as they lay huddled in sleep, and fired a volley of musketry among them, The unfortunate wretches immediately jumped up. One was knocked on the head with an axe; a second was taken prisoner; a third fled, a fourth, whilst lying intoxicated, “was hewn on the head with a cutlass,” which had the effect of rousing him from his slumbers, and he made off. The Dutch thereupon retreated to the fort with great speed.

Page 397, 21 Sep 1659
Nothing, therefore, remained but to send an express to Fort Amsterdam to announce to the Director-general the actual state of affairs, and to request his presence at that place. With this view, an armed party, eighteen or nineteen in number, with a sergeant and eight soldiers, set out for the shore, to forward the dispatches. On their return, they fell into an ambuscade; were unexpectedly surrounded by the Indians, to whom thirteen of the party, including the sergeant and six of his men, surrendered, with their arms in their hands, without firing a shot or offering the least resistance…
The following are the names of the settlers who were taken prisoners on this occasion: Jacob Jansen van Stoutenbergh, Thomas Clapboard, William Carpenter, Pieter Hillebrant, Abraham Pieterz. Vosburg, Evert Pels’ son. Clapboard subsequently made his escape, and young Pels was adopted into the tribe. “The youth took there a wife, who became pregnant, and unwilling to part with him or he with her." See also Alb. Rec. xxiv, 68.

Page 505, 31 Mar 1664
Election holden on the 31st March, 1664, by plurality of votes, for two deputies to be sent from this village, Wiltwyck, to the Manhattans to form a General Assembly, (eene Laenddagh) Whereas, on the summons of the Director-general and Council of New Netherland addressed to the sheriff and commissaries here, it is required that two deputies be sent from our village, Wiltwyck, to a General Assembly in form of a Landdach, the sheriff and commissaries have called us the undersigned inhabitants in Wiltwyck together, on the day underwritten, to elect from the commonalty two proper persons, and to authorize the same as deputies to the said Assembly, which shall be on the 10th April next. We have, therefore, by plurality of votes, chosen the worthy persons Thomas Chambers and Gysbert van Imbroeck, to whom we hereby give full power and authority to conclude whatever may be for the good of the common weal, and the strengthening of this place, and also to do whatsoever shall by them be found wise in the premises, promising to confirm what the said deputies shall have decided in the premises to be best for the public good, under pain of punishment as contraveners; to which end we have subscribed these with our own hands. Done in Wiltwyck, this 31st March, 1664. (Was signed) The mark of Albert Gysbertsen, Tjerk Claessen De Witt, Cornelis Barents Slecht, Evert Pels, Albert Gerritsen, the mark of Juriaen Westphael, the mark of Jan Willemsen Hoochteylingh, Aert Jacobs, the mark of Aertsen Gereetsen van Vliet, the mark of Aert Martensen Doom, the mark of Pieter Jacobsen, the mark of Matthys Roeloffsen, the mark of Jan Broersen, the mark of Jacob Barents Cool, Hendrik Jacobsen. Agrees with its principal, which was signed MATTHEUS CAPITO, Secretary.

Source:  O’Callaghan, E.B., History of New Netherland; or, New York under the Dutch, Vol. II, New York:  D. Appleton & Co., 1855.


From the Court Records of Wildwyck (now Kingston, New York).

Vol. I, Page 5, 25 Oct 1661
Evert de Waeesman, defendant.
The Commissaries demand a mudde of wheat [about four bushels] and seven guilders, nine stivers, which Evert Pels undertakes to pay, the same to go to the poor.

Vol. I, Page 16, 7 Feb 1662
 Dirck Ariaensen, plaintiff, says he worked for Evert Pels during harvest time, and threshed twenty-seven days. He demands, as daily wages for threshing, two guilders, in zeewant, and for harvesting, two guilders, ten stivers, in grain, per day. The defendant, Evert Pels, answers he owes the plaintiff no more than one guilder, ten stivers, for threshing, and two guilders, ten stivers for harvesting, both in zeewant.
 The Commissaries order the defendant to pay the plaintiff for harvesting, two guilders, ten stivers, in wheat, and for threshing, one guilder, ten stivers, in zeewant, each per day.
 Jan Aersen, plaintiff, demands from Evert Pels payment of the quantity of sixty schepels of oats. The defendant admits owing Jan Aersen the above demanded sixty schepels of oats and promises to pay within fourteen days.

Vol. I, Page 24, 28 Feb 1662
 Evert Pels, plaintiff, vs. Geertruyt Andrissen, defendant.
 Plaintiff demands payment of the amount of five hundred guilders, eighteen stivers, to be paid in heavy money.
 The defendant answers that he has a counter bill, and also that the accounts do not agree but that there is a considerable difference between them. The parties are allowed by Schout and Commissaries two weeks’ time to verify and square their accounts, and are ordered to furnish copies to each other.

Vol. I, Page 53, 23 Jan 1663
 Thomas Chambers, Plaintiff, vs. Evert Pels, defendant. Both default.

Vol. I, Page 64
 We, the undersigned, Aldert Heymanse Roosa, Commissary and Elder of the village of Wildtwyck, and Albert Gysberse, Commissary and Deacon of said village, make known that before us appeared the worthy Evert Pels, inhabitant of the village of Wildtwyck, who acknowledged that he actually and in good faith borrowed and received from Roeloof Swartwout and Cornelis Barense Slecht, the appointed guardians of the minor children of the late Mathys Jansen, deceased, the amount of one thousand gldrs., in corn, at beaver’s value, which he agrees to hold at interest for two consecutive years, and promises to give as interest one hundred and twenty gldrs., in corn, beaver’s value, per annum, being twelve gldrs. per cent, commencing February 15, of the current year, 1663, and terminating February 15, 1665, when he will return and reimburse the aforesaid principal and the second year’s interest. For which purpose he, the appearer, specially mortgages his lands, situated near the village Wildtwyck, and his house, standing the aforesaid village, which he says are free and unencumbered; and he further generally pledges his person and goods, real and personal, present and future, nothing excepted, placing and submitting them and himself to and under the jurisdiction of all courts and judges, adding the costs incurred thereby.
 IN testimony whereof we, the above named, and the appearer, have subscribed and authenticated these presents with our own signatures. Done at the village of Wildtwyck, this February 15, 1663.

Evert Pels.
To my knowledge, Alaerdt Heymanz Roose.
This is the mark (x) of Albert Gysbertsen, made by himself.
To my knowledge, Tierck Claszen de Witt.

Vol. I, Page 67, 17 Apr 1663
 Christiaen Nissen romp, plaintiff, vs. Evert Pels, defendant.
 Plaintiff, demands, payment of the amount of ten schepels of wheat due for servant’s wages assigned to him. Defendant answers he does not owe more than three schepels of wheat on the old account, and requests a bill for the thirty gldrs. which Christiaen says he owes for brandy, and says, “I would certainly have paid you if you had not summoned me before the Court.”
 Plaintiff says he settled with defendant, saying, “If I had you outside I would teach you something.” He says his claim is just, and offers to swear to it, as he is voluntarily doing by the oath he has taken.
 The Court orders plaintiff to furnish a proper account, and defendant to pay the same within one month after its receipt.

Vol. I, Page 7, 8 Nov 1661
 Jan Aersen, plaintiff, demands of Evert Pels, defendant, payment of the amount of forty gldrs., thirteen stivers. Defendant offers to pay the plaintiff in strung zeewant. The plaintiff, Jan Aersen, is not satisfied with zeewant. He is ordered to show, at the next session of the Court, whether the debt arose in beavers or in zeewant, and, as the defendant does not admit in owing in beaver price, Jan Aersen is required to submit a true account.

Vol. I, Page 8, 8 Nov 1661
 Basjen (Pieters), plaintiff, vs. Aert Otterspoor. Plaintiff demands of Aert Otterspoor payment of nineteen guilders. Aert Otterspoor admits owing Basjen Pieters nineteen guilders, and assigns to Basjen Pieters (his claim) against Evert Pels who agrees to pay the same.

Vol. I, Page 23, 28 Feb 1662
 Dirck Arianese, plaintiff, vs. Evert Pels, defendant. Plaintiff demands payment of twenty-seven guilders, ten stivers, in wheat, and also forty guilders, ten stivers, in zeewant. Defendant answers he paid four schepels of wheat, leaving a balance due of five schepels. The Commissaries order defendant to pay plaintiff two schepels of wheat within eight days, and of the balance, one schepel each week, and to pay the zeewant within three weeks.

Vol. I, Page 24, 28 Feb 1662
 Evert Pels, plaintiff, vs.Geertruyt Andrissen, defendant.
 Plaintiff demands payment of the amount of five hundred guilders, eighteen stivers, to be paid in heavy money.
 The defendant answers that he has a counter bill, and also that the accounts do not agree but that there is a considerable difference between them, The parties are allowed by Schout and Commissaries two weeks’ time to verify and square their accounts, and are ordered to furnish copies to each other.

Vol. I, Page 32, 27 Apr 1662
 In the matter of the elections, the Schout and Commissaries have decided to nominate the following persons to govern us hereafter, subject to the approval of the Very Noble Honorable Lord Director General and the Lord High Councillors:  Thomas Chambers, Jan Willemse, Tjirick Classen de Wit, Albert Gysbertsen, Aert Jacobsen.
 The Noble Lord Director General and the High Councillor Gerret Decker were this day here present. The Lords Director General and High Councillor continued Evert Pels and Aldert Heymanse Roose as Commissaries, and from the nominees above mentioned appointed Albert Gysbertsen and Tjirick Classen deWit.
 Below stood,
April 27, Ao. 1662, Pieter Stuyvesant.

Vol. I, Page 40, 1 Nov 1662
 Thomas Chambers, plaintiff, vs. Evert Pels, defendant. Plaintiff demands from defendant payment of the amount of seven hundred guilders, in wheat and in oats, according to bill of sale of a house, barn, and lot. The defendant admits the debt, and offers to pay next winter, as his wheat is yet unthreshed.
 Plaintiff demands immediate payment.
 Defendant answers he is unable to pay at once, and offers to restore plaintiff’s property and to pay him a moderate rent for the same, if he is allowed his outlay for repairs.
 Plaintiff refuses to take back his property, but says he proposes to recover his money with costs and accrued and accruing damages. The Schout and Commissaries order defendant to pay plaintiff the amount claimed, within the period of ……etc.

Vol. I, Page 51, 9 Jan 1663
 Jan Jansen de Brabander, plaintiff, vs. Evert Pels, defendant.
 Plaintiff demands payment of seventeen and one-half schepels of wheat and also eighteen and one-half lbs. of butter. Defendant answers he has a bill against this, which plaintiff declines to accept.
 The Court orders the defendant to pay the amount claimed, and, if the defendant has any claim against plaintiff, he may go to Court with it.

Vol. I, Pages 52-53, 9 Jan 1663
 Evert Pels, plaintiff, vs. Juriaen Westvael, defendant. Plaintiff demands of defendant what he has to say against his obligation held by plaintiff, as defendant is not willing to pay it. Defendant demands a bill of particulars.
 Plaintiff answers he is not obliged to give one, because, at the signing of the obligation, they settled their accounts in the presence of Thomas Chambers. He therefore demands payment, or proof by defendant that he does not owe it. Defendant answers he is not disposed to bring any other proof before this court.
 The Commissaries order plaintiff to show defendant the origin of the indebtedness, and the defendant to send in his account to plaintiff.

Vol. I, Page 53, 23 Jan 1663
 Thomas Chambers, plaintiff, vs. Evert Pels, defendant. Both default.

Vol. I, Page 91, 23 Oct 1663
 Tjerck Claesen deWit, plaintiff, vs. Evert Pels, defendant.
 Plaintiff complains that defendant during harvest time caused one of plaintiff’s pigs to be shot. Defendant demands proof. The Honorable Court orders plaintiff to adduce proof.

Vol. I, Page 91, 23 Oct 1663
 Evert Pels informs the Court that Juriaen Westphael received a letter from Jochem Ketelheem at Fort Orange, and requests a copy thereof, which is allowed him.

Vol. I, Page 101, 6 Nov 1663
 Tjerck Claesen de Wit, plaintiff, vs. Evert Pels, defendant.
 Plaintiff requests an extension until the next session of the Court, as he has not yet ready the proofs he is to adduce against plaintiff.
 The Honorable Court orders plaintiff to submit his proofs at its next session, or the Court will decide between the parties on their papers.

Vol. I, Page 110, 18 Dec 1663
 Evert Pels, plaintiff vs. Juriaen Westphael, defendant. The matters between the parties remaining unsettled, the Honorable Court notifies them that they will receive a special hearing tomorrow, and that their papers will be examined at such place as they may agree upon.

Vol. I, Page 114, 27 Dec 1663
 Evert Pels, plaintiff vs. Juriaen Westphael, defendant. Plaintiff demands from defendant the sum of three hundred and seventeen guilders, five stivers, and submits in proof several documents, and requests payment thereof with costs. Defendant requests that the documents be examined.
 The Honorable Court decides that the papers and documents of both parties shall be examined, in the presence of the Provisional Schout, Mattheus Capito, by two members of the Court, Thomas Chambers and Gysbert van Imborch, who are authorized to make such an examination, and, if possible, to settle the matter, and, if they cannot do so, to report in writing at the next Court.

Vol. I, Page 125, 12 Feb 1664
 Evert Pels, plaintiff, vs. Aert Martensen Doorn, defendant.
 Plaintiff requests his whole account against defendant for the sum of five hundred and forty-one guilders, seventeen stivers. Defendant shows a counter claim still incomplete.
 The Honorable Court orders parties to go to good men, namely, Allert Heymans Roose and Cornelis Barentse Slecht, to adjust the accounts on both sides, if possible, and, if not, to again refer to the Court.

Vol. I, Page 128, 26 Feb 1664
 Tjerck Claesen deWit, plaintiff, vs. Evert Pels, defendant.
 Plaintiff demands from defendant two fimmen (or vimmen, plural of vim, the equivalent of a stack of 104 to 108 sheaves) of oats which he loaned defendant last winter. Defendant admits this, but says he has a counter claim against plaintiff.
 The Honorable Court orders parties to liquidate their claims, or, otherwise, that defendant shall submit his counter claim to the Court at its next session.

Vol. I, Page 141, 1 Apr 1664
 Jan Pietersen Muller, plaintiff, vs. Evert Pels, defendant.
 Plaintiff, under power of attorney from Wouter Albertsen, at Fort Orange, demands from defendant five schepels of wheat, he having attached the aforesaid five schepels of wheat in the hands of Aert Jacobsen. Defendant admits the debt.
 The Honorable Court declares the attachment valid, and orders defendant to pay plaintiff the aforesaid demand.

Vol. I, Page 143, 1 Apr 1664
 Hester Douwesen, plaintiff, vs. Evert Pels, Defendant. Absent. Default.

Vol. I, Page 145, 1 Apr 1664
Tjerck Claesen deWit, plaintiff, vs. Evert Pels, defendant. Absent. Default.

Vol. I, Page 155, 24 Jun 1664
 Foppe Barents, plaintiff, vs. Evert Pels, Alert Heymans Roose, absent, and Cornelis Barentsen Slecht, defendants.
 Plaintiff demands from defendants the sum of fifteen guilders, eleven stivers, in seewan, being the balance for carpenter work on the parsonage at Wildwyck.
 Cornelis Barentsen Slecht, appearing alone, says that judgment may be rendered and recorded against them, as Evert Pels, in Foppe Barents’ presence, so verbally instructed him.
 The Honorable Court finds that, as the retired Commissaries have never been willing to render an accounting to the newly installed Commissaries, and the new Commissaries know nothing about the receipts and expenditures, the credits or the debits, the newly installed Commissaries are therefore not willing to accept any bills until the retired Commissaries have rendered their accounts.
 And for cause, the appearers, Cornelis Barentsen Slecht and Evert Pels, are ordered by the Honorable Court to pay the aforesaid demand of the plaintiff who is a country man and a stranger, and therefore must not be delayed.

Vol. I, Page 149, 31 Mar 1664[13]
 Election held March 31, 1664, by a plurality of votes, for the purpose of sending two delegates from the village of Wildwyck to the Manhatans, to a formal Assembly.
 Whereas, according to a written invitation of the Director General and Council of New Netherland to the Schout and Commissaries here, dated March 18, last, it was requested that two delegates from our village of Wildwyck be sent to a formal gathering of an Assembly, the Schout and Commissaries have therefore called upon us, the undersigned inhabitants of Wildwyck, to meet together on the day named below, to select two able persons of the community, and to depute them as delegates to the said meeting which is to take place on April 10. We have therefore selected, by a plurality of votes, the worthy persons, Thomas Chambers and Gysbert van Imborch, to whom we hereby give full power and authority to do what may be necessary for the common interest and that of this place, and also to act in any matter as shall seem to them advisable, confirming what they, the delegates may, according to their obligation, have lawfully done for the common welfare. For which purpose we have personally subscribed to these presents, at Wildwyck, this March 31, 1664.
 (Signed) The mark (x) of Albert Gybertsen, Tjerck Claesen deWitt, Cornelis Barentsen Slecht, Evert Pels, Albert Gysbertsen, the mark (x) of Juriaen Westphael, the mark (x) of Jan Willemse Hoochteylingh, Aert Jacobs, the mark (x) of Ariaen Gerretsen van Vliet, the mark (AMD) of Aert Martensen Doorn, the mark (x) of Pieter Jacobsen, the mark (x) Mattys Roelofsen, the mark (x) of Jan Broersen, the mark (x) of Jacob Barents Cool, Henderick Jochemsen.
         Accords with the original.     To which I certify.
                                                    Mattheus Capito, Secretary.

Vol. I, Page 160, 16 Aug 1664
 (From a list of bidders to become farmer of  “the burgher excise on wine and beer to be consumed within the jurisdiction of” the village of Wildwyck, won by Tomas Harmensen):
…                                        Evert Pels bids  fl. 150…
…Received fl. 3 seewan       Evert Pels bids  fl. 200…

Vol. I, Page 173, 18 Nov 1664
 Johanna De Laet, Plaintiff vs. Evert Pels, Defendant
 Plaintiff says defendant has appropriated her land, being a little island situated near Wildwyck, and has ploughed the same, and there beside shows a deed, dated May 24, 1655, (certifying) that she bought the same of the savage Nanecop, signed by him and three Christian witnesses.
 Defendant says that the aforenamed island belongs to him and produces a certificates stating that he bought the same from the savage Achquanarawyn, signed by Cornelis Barentsen Slecht, Tryntje the wife of said Slecht and Henderick Cornelissen Slecht, and further offers to procure a deed from the savage.
 The case is adjourned by the hon. court till another time.

Vol. I, Page 173, 18 Nov 1664
 Johanna De Laet further shows a copy from the minutes of March 28, 1662, present:  the commissaries Evert Pels, Allert Heymans Roos, Tjerck Claesen De Wit, and Albert Gysbertsen, and requests payment of 30 sch. of wheat which the aforesaid commissaries took it upon themselves to pay.
 The hon. court refers Juffr. De Laet to the aforesaid commissaries.

Vol. I, Page 174, 18 Nov 1664
Henderick Cornelissen, Plaintiff vs. Evert Pels, Defendant. Absent. Default.

Vol. I, Page 179, 25 Nov 1664
 Henderick Cornelissen, ropemaker, Plaintiff vs. Evert Pels, Defendant.
 Plaintiff demands from defendant 40 gldrs. in sewan and requests payment. Defendant says not to intend to pay plaintiff one stiver unless he show him a bill. The hon. orders plaintiff to give defendant a bill.

Vol. I, Pages 182-183, 2 Dec 1664
 Henderick Cornelissen, Plaintiff vs. Evert Pelse, Defendant
 Plaintiff demands from defendant the same amount as was demanded by him at the previous session, being 40 gldrs. in sewan, with the costs of the same. Defendant shows per account to plaintiff not to owe more than 19 gldrs. 10 st. in sewan. The hon. court orders defendant to pay the amount of 19 gldrs. 10 st. in sewan besides the costs, and as soon as plaintiff can prove that he can claim more from defendant, this later demand shall be disposed of.

Vol. I, Pages 196-197, 20 Jan 1665
 Tomas Harmensen, Plaintiff vs. Evert Pels, Defendant
 Plaintiff says that defendant summoned him at the last session of the court, for which he claims his lost time, saying that he has fooled him. Defendant says that he wanted plaintiff to appear at the last session to have plaintiff affirm under oath, why he is not obliged to pay Jonas Rantsou 36 gldrs. in sewan, for which reason defendant still claims from plaintiff aforenamed 36 gldrs. in sewan, unless plaintiff would declare not to owe said amount to Jonas Rantsou.
 The hon. court orders defendant, Evert Pels, to prove that plaintiff, Thomas Harmensen, has promised to pay Jonas Rantsou 36 gldrs. in sewan.

Vol. I, Page 197, 20 Jan 1665
Henderick Cornelissen, Plaintiff vs. Evert Pels, Defendant. Absent. Default.

Vol. I, Page 201, 27 Jan 1665
 Evert Pels, Plaintiff vs. Juriaen Westphael, Defendant
 Plaintiff demands from defendant a sum of 262 gldrs. 5 st. heavy money as per note, and also 20 gldrs. 4 st. light money for expenses incurred. Defendant admits the debt, but says having paid something on the same, viz., 13 sch. of peas, 6 sch. of buckwheat and two half kegs of small beer, amounting to a sum of 45 gldrs. 10 st. heavy money, besides ten sch. of wheat furnished to the help, and a pair of children’s shoes, amounting to 33 gldrs. heavy money. Plaintiff answers and says that the 11 sch. of wheat had been liquidated for the making of the note and claims the expenses incurred and yet to be incurred.
 The hon. court orders that defendant shall prove that he paid the 11 sch. of wheat after passing the note, and defendant is further condemned to satisfy plaintiff’s aforementioned claim with the costs.

Vol. I, Page 201, 27 Jan 1665
 Evert Pels, Plaintiff vs. Pieter Hillebrants, Defendant
 Plaintiff demands from defendant34 gldrs. in beavers which he paid for defendant to Jan Bastiaansen in the year 1659. Defendant says not to owe more than 12 sch. of wheat, and that he paid Jan Simonsen three sch. Plaintiff replies, saying that defendant shall prove that he paid Jan Simonsen three sch. of wheat for the plaintiff.
 The hon. court orders defendant to prove that he has paid the three sch. to Jan Simonsen, or if not, defendant shall pay plaintiff aforesaid claim of 34 gldrs. in beavers.

Vol. I, Page 211-212, 10 Feb 1665
 Roelof Swartwout, appearing in the name of other guardians of the minor children of Mattys Jansen, deceased, says that they have given out on interest to Evert Pels 1,000 gldrs. in beavers’ value, and whereas the two years have elapsed, they, petitioners (for the purpose of not ruining him, if he was to return aforementioned 1000 gldrs. with interest) are willing to allow aforesaid Evert Pels to keep the aforementioned (amount) another year, if he is willing to furnish, besides the mortgage, two satisfactory bondsmen, which he has refused to do, for which reason they, petitioners, want to consult with the hon. court as head guardian, about what to do. The hon. court, having considered the above request, orders Evert Pels to furnish two bondsmen besides the mortgage, or otherwise he shall return the 1,000 gldrs. beavers’ value besides the interest for the two past years without delay.

Vol. I, Page 216, 17 Feb 1665
 The above named guardians (of the minor children of Mattys Jansen), Plaintiffs vs. Evert Pels, Defendant
 When made acquainted with the decision of the hon. court on Feb. 10, 1665, defendant answered that he cannot produce any other sureties than by mortgaging his lands. The guardians aforenamed request the judgment of the court. Defendant says that he offered the aforenamed guardians to privately sell them his house, barn and store-house for the satisfaction of the mortgage and the interest. Plaintiffs reply, saying that they have not got the power to do so, and further that they do not deem it advisable. The hon. court decides that the guardians are justifiable in their demand and it is not advisable to turn real into personal estate, which is subject to fire and other accidents, and also considering that some of the children, upon reaching their majority, will want some money, the hon. court orders defendant to satisfy plaintiffs’ aforementioned claim or to satisfy them in some other manner.

Vol. I, Page 217, 17 Feb 1665
 Evert Pels, Plaintiff vs. Aert Martensen Doorn, Defendant
 Plaintiff demands from defendant a sum of 119 gldrs. 17 st. in heavy money as per note, besides the interest on the same. Defendant admits the debt but says he is powerless to pay the same right away. The Hon. court orders defendant to satisfy plaintiff’s above claim.

Vol. I, Page 218-219, 21 Feb 1665
 We, the undersigned Gysbert Van Imbroch and Henderick Jochemsen, Commissaries of the village of Wildwyck, make known that before us has appeared the worthy Evert Pels, inhabitant of Wildwyck, who declares that, at the request of the guardians of the minor children of the deceased Mattys Jansen, and their consent to keep at interest the 1,000 gldrs. in grain beavers’ value, desires and accepts, as he is accepting, to hold from the aforesaid guardians the aforementioned 1,000 gldrs. at interest at 12 percent, annually, in obedience to previous “schepen knowledge,” dated Feb. 15, 1663, for the period of one more current year, commencing Feb. 15, 1665, and terminating Feb. 15, 1666, under promise of returning and paying said principal of 1,000 gldrs. besides the interest on the same, precisely on Feb. 15 of the coming year 1666, but under the following exception, that if any other creditors, whatever power they may possess, and unknown to aforesaid guardians by subsequent confession of the appearer, might judicially force within the aforesaid time the appearer to satisfy them for their money, the aforesaid guardians are entitled to also claim the above principal with interest of the same, wherefore, he appearer, as per foregoing “schepen knowledge” binds and specially mortgages his lands situated under the village of Wildwyck and his house in the same village which appearer declares to unburdened and unencumbered and further generally his person and further estate, personal and real, present and future, none excepted, submitting himself and them to the jurisdiction of all judges and courts. And produces, besides, the aforesaid mortgage, as bondsmen and fellow-principals Cornelis Barentsen Slecht  and Aert Martensen Doorn, both residents of Wildwyck who besides the appearer also bind their persons and estates, personal and real, present and future, none excepted, with the expenses herefore made and to be made, renouncing for this purpose all exceptions and defences which, in any manner might be contrary to the present. For the purpose of legalizing the same the appearer besides Cornelis Barentsen Slecht and Aert Martensen Doorn, as bondsmen and fellow-principals, have subscribed to the present, besides ourselves, at Wildwyck this Feb. 21, N. S. 1665.

Evert Pels
(signed)                                            Cornelis Barentsen Slecht
the mark AMD of Aert Martensen Doorn
Gysbert Van Imbroch
Henderick Jochemsen

Vol. I, Page 219, 24 Feb 1665
 Evert Pels, Plaintiff vs. Thomas Chambers, Defendant
 Plaintiff says that defendant promised to assist him in paying the semiannual interest on 1,000 gldrs., being 60 gldrs. in grain, beaver’s price. Defendant says he does not remember having promised plaintiff the same. Plaintiff introduces Cornelis Barentsen Slecht, who declares having heard that plaintiff wanted to have said promise of one-half year’s interest mentioned in the “schepen knowledge,” but that defendant, Thomas Chambers, answered, “it is not necessary.” The hon. court orders plaintiff to produce nearer and clearer proof concerning this affair.

Vol. I, Page 221, 24 Feb 1665
 Evert Pels requests that the claim against Juriaen Westphael for the amount of 262 gldrs. 5 st. heavy money and of 20 gldrs. 4 st. light money may be collected by the court. The hon. court orders the officer to proceed with the execution.

Vol. I, Page 221-222, 24 Feb 1665
 Evert Pels requests that the claim against Pieter Hillebrants for the amount of 39 gldrs. in beavers may be collected by the court. The hon. court orders the officer to proceed with the execution.

Vol. I, Page 231, 5 May 1665
 On this day the elected persons (having been elected in accordance with a missive of the hon. Lord. Gov. Genl. Ridsert Nicolls) Evert Pels and Jan Joosten were qualified as commissioners in place of the retiring commissaries Thomas Chambers and Gysbert Van Imbroch, and took the following oath:
We promise and swear that we shall be true and faithful to his Majesty of England  and the Duke of York, and to the Lord Gov. Genl. appointed by them, and to duly obey them; and to observe the stipulations and articles in the instructions given and yet to be given, and to administer good right and justice to the best of our knowledge and without partiality, and further to act as an honest magistrate must be expected to act. So really help me God.

Vol. I, Page 243, 7 Jul 1665
 Evert Pels, Plaintiff vs. Aert Martensen Doorn, Defendant
 Plaintiff protests against defendant on account of damage and expense suffered and yet to be suffered through the pigs which came through defendant’s fence, because plaintiff on last Friday chased 23 pigs off his land, of which he notified defendant, and yesterday, being Monday, he chased more than 30 pigs off his sowed land, and requests compensation for the suffered damage to his grain, and that his grain may be examined and the damages to the same be appraised. Defendant denies that plaintiff can suffer damage by pigs through his fence, saying that in his respect, his fence can bear examination. The hon. court commissions Aert Jacobsen, Tjerck Claesen De Wit, and Juriaen Westphael besides the officer to examine, tomorrow, the fences of both parties, where the pigs can pass through to the sowed land, and the aforesaid three examiners shall appraise the damage caused plaintiff’s wheat, and announce the same to the court.

Vol. I, Page 253, 6 Oct 1665
 Henderick Palingh, Plaintiff vs. Evert Pels, Defendant
 Plaintiff demands of defendant 166 gldrs. 10 st. in sewan, on which has been paid 50 gldrs. Defendant admits the debt and agrees to pay the same next week. The hon. court orders defendant as per his own promise (plaintiff being satisfied with the same) to satisfy the aforesaid claim of plaintiff by next week.

Vol. I, Page 257, 27 Oct 1665
 Bastiaen Pietersen, Plaintiff vs. Evert Pels, Defendant
 Plaintiff demands of defendant payment of 12 sch. of wheat for wages for six days, working on the land, and for 12 days threshing, and requests to have his pay right away because he wants to leave. Defendant answers that plaintiff worked six days on the land and threshed nine days only, and defendant called on him for the purpose of himself earning (plaintiff’s) wages by threshing for him, and consequently did not refuse plaintiff his payment, but plaintiff detained him 14 days with promises of threshing. Plaintiff replies and denies having put off defendant 14 days in regard to threshing. The hon. court orders defendant to pay plaintiff for six days for field work and nine days for threshing.

Vol. I, Pages 274-275, 26 Jan 1666
 Evert Pels requests that the judgment, dated Feb. 17, 1665, against Aert Martensen Doorn, may be judicially enforced. The hon. court orders the officer to proceed with the execution.

Vol. I, Page 287, 23 Mar 1666
  Evert Pels requests by petition, whereas he has taken some money at interest of the guardians of the minor children of Mattys Jansen, deceased, and he promised them to pay annual 12 percent interest, that the hon. court may be pleased to allow him to pay the proper interest as is customary in these countries. He further requests to be permitted to return said borrowed money to aforesaid guardians at the same price as he received the same, viz., the schepel of wheat at 50 st. in beavers.
 The hon. court decides that whereas the contract of “schepen knowledge” was at the time entered into with the consent of both parties, the aforesaid contract is to remain valid, as well in regard to the promised interest as to payment of the principal with the interest of the same, because it has no authority to change similar contracts.

Vol. I, Page 289, 6 Apr 1666
 The guardians of the minor children of Mattys Jansen, deceased, request, whereas Thomas chambers is delaying his business, and Evert Pels still has some money under him with the interest thereon, and Jan Jansen Van Amersfoort as guardian by right of blood has offered them his share, being one-fourth part of the lands of the aforesaid minor children; what they petitioners shall do in this regard, the more so because said one-fourth of the lands can be bought and paid for from the rent and back interest of Evert Pels, and further that they, petitioners, may be not made to suffer the damage in breaking new land.
 The hon. court decides that after Thomas Chambers shall have filed his answer in regard to the demand concerning their administration of the estate, petitioner’s request shall be attended to.

Vol. I, Page 307, 2 Nov 1666
 Joris Hael, Plaintiff vs. Evert Pels, Defendant
 Plaintiff demands of defendant 61 gldrs. for received merchandise. Defendant admits the debt, and agrees to satisfy plaintiff next week. The hon. court orders defendant to satisfy plaintiff’s demand.

Vol. I, Page 314, 23 Nov 1666
Jacob Barents Cool, Plaintiff vs. Evert Pels, Defendant
Plaintiff demands of defendant on account of his brother 24 sch. of oats and 17 gldrs. in sewan, in payment of wages earned by his brother. Defendant admits the debt. The hon. court orders defendant to satisfy plaintiff’s demand.

Vol. I, Page 316, 14 Dec 1666
 Henderick Palingh, Plaintiff vs. Evert Pels, Defendant.
 Plaintiff demands of defendant 100 gldrs. in sewan. Defendant denies the debt, but says owing 72 gldrs. from which are to be deducted six gldrs. for carting a load, and requests bill of defendant for received wines. The hon. court orders plaintiff to send in an account to defendant, and orders defendant to satisfy plaintiff for the amount of the bill.

Vol. I, Page 319, 8/18 Jan 1667
 Leendert Barents, Plaintiff vs. Evert Pels, Defendant.
 Plaintiff demands of defendant 33 sch. of wheat, less one gldr. Defendant denies this claim, and is willing to compare accounts with plaintiff and to pay him this week. The hon. court orders parties to mutually liquidate their accounts and orders defendant to satisfy plaintiff for what defendant may be found to owe plaintiff.

Vol. I, Page 319, 8/18 Jan 1667
 Evert Prys, Plaintiff vs. Evert Pels, Defendant.
Plaintiff demands of defendant an amount of 115 gldrs. balance as shown by account handed in. Defendant refers to account delivered by him to plaintiff, and on account whereof plaintiff claims of defendant of two gldrs. 12 ½ st. which is shown by the account which was produced by defendant and defendant agrees to show that plaintiff, at harvest time, did not work more than 10 1.2 days and in the barn not more than4 ½ days. Defendant also demands a copy of plaintiff’s bill. Defendant is permitted a copy of plaintiff’s bill for the purpose of proving, as he has agreed to do, the mistakes in plaintiff’s account.

Vol. I, Pages 326-7, 29 Jan/8 Feb 1667
Evert Pels, Plaintiff vs. Jacob Barents Cool, Defendant
Plaintiff demands of defendant 15 sch. of wheat for Jan Verbeeck, by virtue of a power of attorney, and requests that the attachment levied at Albany by the court messenger there on Jan Cornelissen Smith for the amount of 10 sch. of wheat, may be declared valid. Defendant admits the debt, and says that about four years ago he paid on it to Jacob Joosten four sch. of wheat as attorney for Jan Verbeeck, to be paid to Jan Verbeeck, and further says that he told Jan Cornelissen, before he went to Albany this winter, that he would pay 10 sch. of wheat on his account to Reydert Pietersen, and promises to pay the balance as soon as possible to Jan Verbeeck. Jan Cornelissen, having been cited on this account, and having been asked whether he agreed to pay 10 sch. of wheat to Reydert Pietersen on the account of Jacob Barents Cool, before he went to Albany, answers that he was not specially charged to pay Reydert Pietersen these 10 sch., but only that in a discourse he was told by Jacob Barents that he, Jacob Barents, owed Reydert Pietersen. The hon. court decides, whereas at Jan Cornelissen’s at Albany, 10 sch. of wheat have been attached by Jan Verbeeck, and defendant admits the debt, therefore said attachment is declared valid.

Vol. I, Pages 328-9, 29 Jan/8 Feb 1667
 Marietje Simons, Plaintiff vs. Jannetie Pels, Defendant
 Plaintiff demands of defendant 17 gldrs. for wages. Defendant answers and asks plaintiff how many days she worked for her. Plaintiff answers that she does not actually remember the days, and has off and on worked for her, and still demands the aforenamed amount of 17 gldrs. Defendant thereupon says, if plaintiff can prove the days of her labor, she is willing to satisfy her. The hon. court orders plaintiff to show at the next session how many days she worked for defendant, or else to affirm her demand under oath.

Vol. I, Page 329, 29 Jan/8 Feb 1667
 Evert Prys, Plaintiff vs. Evert Pels, Defendant
 The accounts and documents of both parties having been received, the hon. court has found that plaintiff has a claim against defendant for work on the barn, six days, 36 gldrs.; for five days’ threshing while he was in de Konigh’s employ, 18 gldrs. 15 st.; for five days’ chopping wood, 15 gldrs.; for 11 days’ threshing, 33 gldrs.; for 11 days’ harvesting, 66 gldrs., amounting to a total of 168 gldrs. 15 st. Plaintiff is ordered to prove the further claim for 1½ days’ harvesting. Defendant’s counter claim is as follows:  for seven weeks’ board at 10 gldrs. per week, 70 gldrs.; for two days’ threshing, six gldrs.; and still one weeks’ board when plaintiff had hurt his leg, 10 gldrs., amounting to a total of 86 gldrs. He, defendant, having been asked whether he was ready to affirm his difference with plaintiff’s account under oath, answered, “No.” Therefore, plaintiff has a balance in his favor of 82 gldrs. 15 st., after having deducted from plaintiff’s amount of 168 gldr. 15 st. defendant’s claim of 86 gldrs. And therefore defendant is ordered to pay plaintiff the balance, being 82 gldrs. 15 st. and the costs.

Vol. I, Page 331, 12/22 Feb 1667
 Cornelis Slecht and Aert Martensen Doorn, Plaintiffs vs. Evert Pels, Defendant. Absent. Default.
 Plaintiffs request to be relieved from the security for defendant, for the principal and interest of the children of Mattys Jansen, deceased.

Vol. I, Pages 331-332, 12/22 Feb 1667
 Roelof Swartwout and Cornelis Barentsen Slecht,, guardians of the minor children of Mattys Jansen, deceased, Plaintiffs, vs. Evert Pels, Defendant. Absent. Default.
 Plaintiffs demand of defendant, though absent, payment as per “schepen knowledge” of the amount of 1,537 gldrs. 12 st. in beavers, or in case of default, immediate judicial enforcement with costs.
 Jan Tyssen, son of Mattys Jansen, deceased, also requests that Evert Pels’ debt may be paid, in the same manner as the aforenamed guardians have demanded the same. For reasons, defendant has been cited by the court messenger to appear, and to defend his cause. He answers that he knows the affair very well, as well in regard to the sureties, as to the guardians, and that, to this account, he is awaiting the judgment of the hon. court, and will submit to the same. The hon. court orders defendant to satisfy plaintiffs’ demand with costs, because as per the court messenger’s report, defendant has admitted to have nothing to say against it in defense, and plaintiffs are permitted, in case of nonimmediate payment, to judicially proceed against defendant.

Vol. I, Page 333, 12/22 Feb 1667
 Evert Prys produces two declarations against Evert Pels by virtue of the order of the hon. court on Jan. 29/Feb. 8 last, whereby he proves having cut oats for Evert Pels in the year 1666 during 1 ½ day, and Evert Pels is consequently ordered to pay plaintiff for 1 ½ day harvesting, being nine gldrs.
 Evert Prys requests that the judgment dated Jan. 29/Feb. 8 last as also his foregoing proof of the 1 ½ day’s wages during harvest time against Evert Pels shall be judicially enforced. The officer is ordered to proceed with the execution.

Vol. I, Pages 336-337, 19 Feb/1 Mar 1667
 Roelof Swartwout and Cornelis Barents Slecht,, guardians of the minor children of Mattys Jansen, deceased, request approval by the hon. court in regard to the purchase of Evert Pels’ farm on Feb. 15/25, 1667, bought by them in the presence of Thomas Chambers, stepfather, and Margarita Hendericks, mother of said minor children. The hon. schout Willem Beeckman advises that said guardians shall show that said purchase is to the advantage of the minors, because the children last year and also at the last session petitioned to collect the money of Evert Pels for the purpose of exploiting and tilling of the uncultivated lands. Jan Joosten, commissary, also advises the preceding. Evert Pels, commissary, as seller of the farm, cannot give advice concerning the same. Thomas Chambers, commissary, as stepfather of the minors, cannot give advice in the case.

Vol. I, Pages 337-338, 26 Feb/8 Mar 1667
 Reyndert Pietersen, Plaintiff vs. Evert Pels, Defendant
 Plaintiff demands of defendant the amount of 145 gldrs. in beavers, as per balance. Defendant answers having a bill against this, and says the above settlement can be paid in sewan, and further that he paid five beavers and 30 planks on said bill. The hon. court refers parties to two good men and impartial, viz., to Henderick Jochemsen and Willem Montagnie, for the purpose, if possible, to settle the differences between parties, and, if not, parties shall again address the court at the next session with the report of the good men.

Vol. I, Page 338, 26 Feb/ 8 Mar 1667
 Evert Pels, Plaintiff vs. Aert Martensen Doorn, Defendant. Absent. Default.

Vol. I, Pages 341-342, 12/22 Mar 1667
 Reynier Pietersen, Plaintiff vs. Evert Pels, Defendant
 Plaintiff demands of defendant the same as by a previous demand, the amount of 146 gldrs. in beavers, as per settlement and note on July 18, 1659. Defendant gives in a counter-claim, amounting to 95 gldrs. in beavers and 55 gldrs. 16 st. in sewan. Plaintiff replies and denies the entire counter-claim, except seven English shillings for 14 gldrs. in sewan, and requests that defendant shall prove the rest of his counter-claim, or affirm the same under oath. Defendant, having been asked whether after the balancing of accounts, he has delivered such goods to plaintiff and for the amounts as drawn out in the counter bill, and whether he is willing to enforce said counter claim under oath, says, “Yes,” and consequently took the required oath. The hon. court orders defendant to pay plaintiff the balance of his counter claim, being 31 gldrs. 8 st., with costs.

Page 343, 12/22 Mar 1667
The curators of the estate of Henderick Cornelissen, deceased, request that the money of Christoffel Davids in the custody of Evert Pels, from the suit of H. Cornelissen and Christoffel Davids. Amounting to 100 gldrs., shall be attached by the officer, and said attachment having taken place, that the attachment shall be declared valid.
Whereas Christoffel Davids has been beaten[14] by the plaintiff, Henderick Cornelissen, as per judgment, therefore said attachment, after having been executed by the officer, is declared valid by the hon. court.

Vol. I, Page 345, 26 Mar/5 Apr 1667
 Willem Beeckman, Plaintiff vs. Evert Pels, Defendant. Absent. Default.

Vol. I, Page 347, 26 Mar/5 Apr 1667
These four below-named persons are nominated by the commissaries from among the community, that the hon. Lord Gov. Genl. may appoint two from among them as incoming commissaries (in place of) retiring present commissaries Evert Pels and Jan Joosten, viz., Cornelis Barents Slecht, Allert Heymans Roos, Jan Willemsen Hoochteylingh, Henderick Jochemsen.

Vol. I, Page 347, 21/31 Mar 1667
 Willem Beeckman requests whereas Evert Pels did not appear after the summons of demand of debt and is indebted to the amount of 70 gldrs. which he accepted to pay of the back farm money for the farmer Palingh, and whereas he is now about to leave and has sold most of his real and personal estate, that (petitioner) may therefore be permitted, for the purpose of securing his claim, to arrest his person. Whereas Evert Pels is still possessed of sufficient property which has remained unsold and does not remove with his entire family outside the limits of this village, therefore the arrest of the person of Evert Pels is not permitted by the hon. court.

Vol. I, Page 347, 26 Mar/5 Apr 1667
These four below-named persons are nominated by the commissaries from among the community, that the hon. Lord Gov. Genl. may appoint two from among them as incoming commissaries (in place of) retiring present commissaries Evert Pels and Jan Joosten, viz., Cornelis Barents Slecht, Allert Heymans Roos, Jan Willemsen Hoochteylingh, Henderick Jochemsen.

Vol. I, Page 349, 29 Apr/9 May 1667
 Evert Pels requests whereas he is about to remove from here, that another shall be appointed in his place as guardian and curator of the estate of Jan Albertsen Van Steenwyck, deceased, besides Henderick Jochemsen. The hon. court in regard to this requests and appoints Jan Willemsen Hoochteylingh as curator of said estate.

Vol. I, Page 349, 29 Apr/9 May 1667
 Evert Pels requests whereas on his bill he is taxed for 25 morgens, and he has not possessed more than 20 morgens, to have the overcharge deducted which is allowed him by the hon. court.
 He also requests for the use of his barn for the ministry some compensation, and consequently the hon. court allows him 125 gldrs. in sewan, in reduction of his village taxes.

Vol. I, Page 350, 14/24 May 1667
 On this date, in place of the retiring commissaries Evert Pels, Jan Joosten, and Roelof Swartwout, have taken their proper oath as incoming commissaries:  Jacob Burhans and Henderick Aertsen (Henderick Jochemsen, the third, being absent), in accordance with the appointment of the Hon. Ld. Governor Genl., from a previous nomination.

Vol. I, Page 364, 15/25 Oct 1667
 Hend. Jochemsen, Plaintiff vs. Jannetie Pels, Defendant
 Plaintiff says having levied an attachment, for Phillip Schyler under Reynier Van Coelen, for a claim of 20 beavers which plaintiff says Evert Pels owes him (Phillip Schyler). Defendant demands proof of debt, and says that she now came from Albany and that Philip Schuyler did not speak to her about it. The hon. court refuses the attachment because plaintiff has no power of attorney and neither can he show the origin of the debt.

Vol. I, Page 365-366, 15/25 Oct 1667
 Madaleen Dircx, Plaintiff vs. Annetie Adriaens, Defendant
 Plaintiff complains that defendant yesterday came to her house with the intention of making trouble, whereupon she was told to leave the house. She not being willing to do so, plaintiff took hold of her sleeve, and said to her that she should go outside, whereupon defendant attacked her, and beat her so that her flesh became discolored in her house. Defendant says that she came to her house for the purpose of paying Jannetie Pels for a sch. of apples, and that then a few words were said which caused the trouble, Jannetie Pels and Henry Palingh declare, at the request of plaintiff, that they were at the house and that they saw and heard that plaintiff did not treat defendant badly, or give her cause for the assault. The hon. court recommends parties to keep the peace, or else it will be obliged to punish according to law.

Volume II, Pages 400-1, 10/20 Mar 1667/8
Jochem Kettelheyn, Plaintiff vs. Marretie Hans., widow of Jur. Westphael, Defendant.
 Plaintiff demands of defendant 900 gldrs., deliverable payment, in value as when the payment was reckoned, according contract and letter of dismissal, they being in partnership on a certain farm, and Juriaen having taken it upon himself to pay the debts contracted in partnership, which contract was written in the year 1650…Further also 50 gldrs. in beavers paid to Evert Pels, on account of the co-partnership of the farm…Defendant, the widow, being assisted by Roelof Swartwout, admits the above contract, and owing the 900 gldrs., provided two muddes of wheat are to be deducted which plaintiff admits having received, and denies knowledge of the other items, and therefore demands proof that said items have received in the co-partnership of the farm, and the attorney says in regard to the item to Ev. Pels, the same has been paid, to Evert Pels, according to judgment, and therefore maintains that it need not be paid twice.
 The hon. court orders the defendant to pay the above claim of 900 gldrs. with the costs of the present, provided that she may deduct two mudde of wheat. In regard for the demand for interest, it was not evident that interest had been mentioned in the contract, and the court was informed that after date they often were together, and it does not appear that they made any further contract or agreement, therefore he is refused the demand for interest up to date, and plaintiff is ordered to produce proof in regard to the other amounts, that they were received and paid in behalf of the co-partnership. This having been done in a proper manner, the defendant is then ordered to pay the same…

Vol. II, Pages 404-5, 26 Mar 1668
Jochem Ketelheym, Plaintiff vs. Marretie Hans, widow of Juriaen Westphael, Defendant.
 …Plaintiff further demands 50 gldrs. in beavers, as per receipt, for a payment made to Evert Pels…In regard to the plaintiff’s demand for 50 gldrs. in beavers paid to Evert Pels, the hon. court refers to the proof in accordance with the previous sentence Mar. 10/20. Roelof Swartwout, appearing at the meeting in his quality of guardian, gives notice that he had arrested the wife of Evert Pels and attached some grains and effects, because her husband is neglectful in delivering the deed of the sold land according to contract, and requests that said arrest and attachment shall be declared valid. The hon. court decides that in this case the wife cannot be arrested, but the attachment of the effects and grains is declared valid.

Vol. II, Page 416, 17/27 Nov 1668
 Jan Cornelissen as the attorney of Geertie Nanninghs, gives notice of the attachment levied under the hands of Lambert Huybersen, on the money of Evert Pels, and shows a certificate passed by Jochem Wessels, containing that Geertie Nanninghs has paid to Jurriaen Blanck on account of Evert Pels the amount of 10 beavers, and requests that the attachment shall be declared valid. The hon. court declares the attachment valid, until the arrival of Evert Pels.

Vol. II, Page 428, 9 Mar 1668/9
 The Heer Beeckman as attorney for Dom. Megapolensis has levied an attachment on the money belonging to Evert Pels which Geertie Nanningh has attached under the hands of Lambert DeBoer…The hon. court declares the attachment valid, but the money shall not be touched until Evert Pels and Wilhem Bout shall have settled their accounts.

Vol. II, Page 430, 22 Mar 1668/9
 Geertie Bouts appeared before the hon. court and showed a certain writing, from which it appears that she may justly claim the amount of 20 whole beavers, and also claims for damage and interest. The hon. court declares the attachment valid, until she have seen Evert Pels.

Vol. II, Page 436, 20/30 Oct 1669
It was resolved by the hon. court to notify the people that those  being desirous of becoming corn-measurer, and also to watch at the Rondout (shall apply). Evert Pels and Cornelis Vernooy then applied, and contracted for the watch at the Rondout, and were also appointed corn-measurers, and shall each receive for this year35 sch. of wheat, and they shall further receive instructions, an accordance wherewith they shall have to act.

Vol. II, Page 448
On this sixth day of October, 1670, their honors of the court, viz., the Hon. Heer Willem Beecqman, Cornelis Wyncoop, Wallerand DuMont, T. Chambers, resolved that the salary fixed for those guarding the Ronduyt shall not continue, but that the person living at the Ronduyt and able to act as measurer shall be appointed measurer besides Evert Pels, and shall receive his salary in accordance with the instructions given to them, viz., for measuring per schepel one stiver light money.

Vol. II, Page 448
On this 10th day of October, 1670, their honors of the court again appoint Evert Pels as measurer, under condition that he shall guard at the Ronduyt, and shall not receive any more salary.

Vol. II, Page 500
Instruction for Evert Pels, A. Jansen, court messenger, and R. Gouldsberry. 1) They shall immediately depart for the purpose of learning the condition of affairs at New York, because we have been informed that there are some Holland vessels there for the purpose of taking the country. 2) They shall sail in a boat until they shall meet some yacht or Christians whom they shall ask how things are in New York, and having received trustworthy information shall return immediately and report to us. August 5, 1672, at Kingston, by the hon. court at Kingston, (signed) W. LaMontagne, secretary.
On this August 5, 1672, it was resolved to dispatch Evert Pels and Robbert Gouldsberry to New York for the purpose of receiving information about the state of affairs at New York. And each of them shall receive a sch. of wheat per day for his trouble…

Vol. II, Page 512, 27 Feb 1673/4
 Leendert Barentsen Kool, Plaintiff vs. Everdt Pels, Defendant. 1st Default.

Vol. II, Page 519, 19 Jun 1674
Schout Grevenraedt, Plaintiff vs. Wallerand DuMon, Defendant
 Plaintiff says that defendant, on the day of prayer, went out in a boat. Wallerand DuMon says that after the close of religious services he went to the strand, but he did not fish, and that the fishing rods which were in the boat had been left there by Evert Pels.

From the Kingston, Ulster, New York Secretary’s Papers

Vol. II, Pages 550-1, 3 Dec 1664
On this December 3, N.S., of the year 1664, appeared before me, Mattheus Capito, secretary of the village of Wildwyck in the presence of the below-named witnesses, the worthy Evert Pels, party of the first part, who declares having let, and Albert Govertsen of Steenwyck, party of the second part, who also declares having rented of the aforenamed lessor a parcel of land situated under (the jurisdiction of) the new village in the Esopus, about 12 morgens in extent, being the easternmost portion of the lessor’s farm, upon the following conditions. (Here the contract terminates, one page and a half having been left blank in the original.)

Vol. II, Pages 556-7, 21 Feb 1664/5
On this February 21, 1664/5, appeared before me, Mattheus Capito, Secretary of the village of Wildwyck, the worthy Evert Pels, resident of Wildwyck, who, in the presence of the below-named witnesses, declares to owe to the guardians of the minor children of the deceased Mattys Jansen a sum of 240 gldrs. in grain, beavers value, originating on account of back interest for two years’ on a sum of 1,000 gldrs., which aforesaid amount of 240 gldrs. as interest on 1,000 gldrs. has fallen due on Feb. 15 of this above-mentioned year, which aforesaid sum of 240 gldrs. interest due the appearer promises to pay to the aforesaid guardians within the period of 14 days after the aforenamed date, and by default the aforesaid amount shall bear compound interest at 12 percent, commencing from Feb. 15 of the above year, in such a manner that this overdue interest of the aforesaid amount shall be added to the principal of 1,000 gldrs., making an amount of 1,240 gldrs. principal. For the purpose of complying with the present, he, the appearer, binds his person and estate in conformity with a “schepen knowledge” passed on this day. And for the purpose of legalizing the present, the appearer besides Gysbert Van Imbroch and Henderick Jochemsen as witnesses called in and invited for the purpose, have signed the same with their own hand at Wildwyck, on the day and in the year mentioned above. (Signed) Evert Pels, Gysbert Van Imbroch, Henderick Jochemsz. In my presence, (signed) Mattheus Capito, Secretary.

Vol. II, Page 571, 9 Sep 1665 (NS)
(From list of items sold at auction from “the effects of the deceased Mr. Gysbert Van Imbroch, surgeon”)
 …Evert Pels—a flint lock, 37 gldrs…

Vol. II, Pages 635, 9/19 Feb 1667
On this February 9/19, 1667, appeared before me, Mattheus Capito, secretary of the village of Wildwyck, and the below-named witnesses the worthy persons Evert Pels, of the first part, and Henderick Cornelissen, Lyndraejer, of the second part, who declare having contracted in the following manner:  Evert Pels declares having sold and Henderick Cornelissen having bought of the seller, aforenamed, a farm with the lot of the same, situated under and in the new village in the Esopus, the farming land being divided in two parcels, both 22 morgen 150 rods in extent, all as shown by the deed existing of the same allowed and granted him by the ex-director General, the hon. Heer Petrus Stuyvesant, and the hon. Heeren councilors of New Netherland, dated Apr. 25, 1663. For which purchase of the aforesaid farm and lot belonging to it, the purchaser promises to pay the aforesaid seller an amount of 152½ sch. of good winter wheat or the value of the same, in three payments or installments. The first, a just one-third, shall be due on next Christmas of this current year; the second, also being a just one-third, on May 1 of the following year 1668; the third or last installment, also being a just one-third, on Christmas of the same year 1668. The grantor promises to deliver to the grantee the aforesaid farm and lot free and unencumbered, except the Lord’s rights, and have at his expense the aforesaid deed conformed by this present government. And after having received the last installment, to properly convey and transfer the same to the grantees. With which aforesaid contract the respective appearers are mutually satisfied, under promise of irrevocably complying with the same, pledging their persons and estates as per law. For which end the appearers, besides Roelof Swartwout and Gerret Fooken as witnesses invited and requested for the purpose, have signed the present with their own hand at Wildwyck on the day and in the year named above. (Signed) Roelof Swartwout, Gerret Fooken; Evert Pels, Henderick Cornelissen. In my presence, (signed) Mattheus Capito, Secretary.

Page 636-637, 12/22 Feb 1667
On this February 12/22, 1667, appeared before me, Mattheus Capito, secretary of the village of Wildwyck, and the below-named witnesses Christoffel Davids, of the first part, and Evert Pels, of the second part, who declare having contracted with each other in the following manner:  Christoffel Davids declares having sold and Evert Pels having bought of the aforesaid seller, his land situated on the bank of the Esopus Kil, near the rondout, to the east of the wagon road, running till a running little kil and extending till the second mountain in the interior of the country up to the Ponckhachking path, and with it his dwelling standing on the bank near the rondout. For which land and dwelling the purchaser promises to pay the seller an amount of 300 gldrs. heavy money in wheat, in three installments, the first in November next of this year, being a just one-third portion. The second installment in November of the year 1668, also being a just one-third portion, and the third installment in November in the year 1669, being also a just one-third part. The grantor promises to deliver the aforesaid land and little dwelling on May 1 next, free and unencumbered excepting the Lord’s right, and with them the deed for the same. With which beforenamed contract the appearers are satisfied, under promise of both sincerely complying with the same, pledging their persons and estates as per law. And on this account the appearers, besides the hon. Heer Willem Beeckman and Louwies Dubois as witnesses invited and requested for the purpose, have subscribed to the present with their own hand at Wildwyck on the day and in the year named above. (Signed) The mark C D of Christoffel Davids, Evert Pels. (Signed) Wilh. Beeckman, Louys Dubois, witnesses. In my presence, (signed) Mattheus Capito, Secretary.

Vol. II, Pages 637-8, 15/25 Feb 1667
On this February 15/25, 1667, appeared before me, Mattheus Capito, Secretary of the village of Wildwyck, and the below-named witnesses the worthy persons, Evert Pels, of the first part, Roelof Swartwout and Cornelis Barentsen Slecht, guardians of the minor children of the deceased Mattys Jansen, of the second part, who declare having contracted with each other in the following manner:  Evert Pels declares having sold and Roelof Swartwout with Cornelis Barentsen Slecht, the aforesaid guardians, having bought of the aforenamed seller, his farm situated under the village of Wildwyck, as the same is as present surrounded by a stockaded fence, (the limits of the same are the wagon road towards the east till the bridge across the Kil, and towards the west the farmland of Aert Martensen Doorn which two farms are separated by a small kil) besides his dwelling, barn, two stacks and the lot of the  same and whatever is fast in the ground and fixed by nail as the same is at present surrounded by a fence of palisades, situated in the village of Wildwyck between the lots of the hon. Heer Petrus Stuyvesant and Thomas Chambers. For which above specified farming land, house, barn, stacks and adjoining lot the said purchasers pay the aforesaid seller an amount of 1,537 gldrs. 12 st. ready money, both of which, the aforesaid “schepen knowledge” dated Feb. 21, 1665, and a further obligation dated Feb. 21, 1665, both of which, the aforesaid “schepen knowledge” as well as the obligation are annulled by the present and shall have no further force. The aforesaid grantees promise still to pay the grantor for the aforesaid land, house and lot as specified before, in the middle of October of this current year a quantity of 140 sch. of winter wheat or the value of the same. The grantor, therefore, by the present cedes, conveys and transfers to the aforesaid grantees the beforenamed farmland, house, barn, stacks and the lot of them free and unencumbered except the Lord’s right, not willing or reserving any authority, right or claim in the same either for himself or his heirs, provided he shall live in the same house till May 1 next. And the risk of the house, barn and stacks through negligence through his own fire shall fall upon him. And the grantor by the present promises to deliver the deed of the aforesaid land to the said grantees within the stipulated time published by the hon. Heer Ridsert Nicolls to have the deeds confirmed by him, the expenses for the said confirmation by the grantor to be paid by the grantees upon delivery of the same, and in case of neglect by the grantor the confirmation, if it has to be done out of time as said before, shall come and fall to the charge of the grantor. The title or confirmation of the house and lot at Wildwyck shall be delivered by the grantor to the grantees in the same manner as he, by conveyance, has received and bought the same of his predecessor Thomas Chambers. And for the purpose of complying with the before specified contract as well in regard to purchase as to sale and conveyance, the respective appearers promise by the present to act with sincerity, pledging their persons and estates as per law. On which account the said appearers, besides Thomas Chambers and Louwies Dubois, both residents of this village of Wildwyck, as witnesses invited and requested for the purpose, have subscribed to the present with their own hand at Wildwyck on the day and in the year named above. (Signed) Evert Pels, Roelof Swartwout, Cornelis Barents Slect. (Signed) Thomas Chambers, Louys Dubois. In my presence, (signed) Mattheus Capito, Secretary.

Vol. II, Page 643, 16/26 Mar 1667
 
On this March 16/26, 1667, appeared before me, Mattheus Capito, Secretary of the village of Wildwyck, in the presence of the below named witnesses the worthy Evert Pels, resident of the village of Wildwyck, who, by the present, conveys to the Hon. Heer Jeremias Van Rentselaer a quantity of 140 sch. of winter wheat or the value of the same, to receive the said quantity in the middle of October of this current year 1667 of the guardians of the minor children of the deceased Mattys Jansen. And therefore the appearer, besides Thomas Chambers and Albert Jansen Van Steenwyck, as witnesses invited and requested for the purpose, has signed the present with his own hand at Wildwyck on the day and in the year named before. (Signed) Evert Pels. (Signed) Thomas Chambers, Albert Jansen Van Steenwyck. In my presence, (signed) Mattheus Capito, Secretary.
 On this aforenamed date, we, Roelof Swartwout and Cornelis Barents Slecht, guardians of the minor children of the deceased Mattys Jansen, have accepted this before named conveyance by Evert Pels to the hon. Heer Jeremias Van Rentselaer, to be paid in the middle of October of this current year 1667. And therefore we, besides Thomas Chambers and Albert Jansen Van Steenwyck as witnesses invited and requested for the purpose, have signed the present with our own hands at Wildwyck on the day and in the year named before. (Signed) Roelof Swartouwt, Cornelis Barentsen Slecht, Thomas Chambers, Albert Jansen Van Steenwyck. In my presence, (signed) Mattheus Capito, Secretary.

Vol. II, Pages 646-8, 2 Apr 1667
 Conditions and terms whereupon Evert Pels intends to sell at public auction to the highest bidder some farming implements and other effects:  1) The movable goods must be paid for on Oct. 15 of the below-written year, viz., if the value of the purchased articles exceeds 25 gldrs. And whatever is sold at or below 25 gldrs. will have to be paid for inside of eight days, unless the purchaser bought several parcels which together exceed 25 gldrs. in value. The garden, with its fence, along the wagon road, situated under the village of Wildwyck, between the wagon road and the land of the hon. Heer Petrus Stuyvesant, now cultivated by the hon. Heer Willem Beeckman, shall be paid for by the purchaser or “mynder” in the first half of October of this below-named year. The land situated under the new village in the Esopus, the extent and limitation whereof is to be seen in the deed, (shall be paid for) in two installments, the first to fall due on next Candlemas of the year 1668,  the second installment on Candlemas of the following year 1669. the seller intends to immediately surrender to the purchaser the bill of sale of the aforesaid land, but the renewal of the same shall rest with the purchaser. The payment shall be made with winter wheat, the sch. valued at six gldrs., and other grains in proportion. The purchaser shall be obliged to furnish two sufficient sureties for the purchase, each one as principal, one for all, to the satisfaction of the seller. And in case the seller cannot furnish sufficient sureties said effects shall again be offered for sale, and in case they should bring less, this will be charged to the first purchaser, and in case they should bring more the first purchaser shall not profit thereby. And in case there should happen to be one or more purchasers to whom the seller is indebted, similar purchased articles shall be considered as a settlement of said accounts, up to the amounts at which they were sold. The stiver money shall come and fall to the charge of the purchaser. Thus enacted at Wildwyck in the presence of the Heer Officer Willem Beeckman, and Commissaries Thomas Chambers and Roelof Swartwout, this April 2, N.S., 1667.
 Sale. Reynier Van der Coele, a plow, 166 gldrs. Tjerck Claesen, a wagon, 30 gldrs. Reynier Van Coele, a stack-nave with the stack pole, 68 gldrs. Daniel Broodhead, shanks and hoops for a wagon, 76 gldrs. Reynier V. Coele, a ploughshare and coulter, 25 gldrs. Tjerck Claesen, six sieves, 22 gldrs. Hendr. Jochemsen, six sieves, 43 gldrs.; four wharves, one balance, two turnpoles, 15 gldrs. Reynier V. Coelen, a winnow, 30 gldrs. 5 st. Broodhead, a winnow, 22 gldrs. Hendr. Jochems., eight half barrels, 25 gldrs. Jan Willemsen, some old iron work, 21 gldrs. 10 st.
 Jan Oosterhout, a chopping bench with cutting knife, 26 gldrs. 10 st. Broodhead, a harrow with iron teeth, 34 gldrs. Reynier v d Coele, two leather hames, 33 gldrs. Lambert Huybertsen, a heifer, 36 gldrs. 5 st. Broodhead, a black bull calf, 25 gldrs. 10 st. Willem Beeckman, a red bull calf, 27 gldrs. 10 st. Reynier v d Coele, a beam, sleigh and two wheels, 10 gldrs. Paul Paulusen, a heifer, one year old, 110 gldrs. Arent Theunissen, the garden, 140 gldrs. Lambert Huyberts, the land under the new village, 626 gldrs. Reynier V, Coelen, a gelding 361 gldrs. Albert Jansen, a stack ladder, 8 gldrs. 5 st. Handerick Palingh, a brewing vat, 33 gldrs. Total:  2,014 gldrs. 15 st.
 I become surety for Reyner Van der Coele, (signed) Jan Joosten.
 I become surety for Capt. Daniel Broodhead, (signed) Will Beeckman.
 I become surety for Tjerck Claesen, (signed) Jan Jansen Van Oosterhout.
 I become surety for Henderick Jochemsen, (signed) Harman Hyndrychsen.
 I become surety for Jan Jansen Van Oosterhout, (signed) Albert Jansen Van Stenwyck.
 I become surety for Paul Paulusen, (signed) Jan Jansen Van Oosterhout.
 I become surety for Arent Teunissen, (signed) Wilh. Beeckman.
 We become sureties for Lambert Huybertsen, (signed) Tjerck Claszen De Witt, Albert Jansen Van Stenwyck, for 626 gldrs.

Page 651, 27 Mar/6 Apr 1667
On this March 27/ April 6, 1667, appeared before me, Mattheus Capito, Secretary of the village of Wildwyck, and the belownamed witnesses, Christoffel Davids, who declares having conveyed and ceded as by the present he is ceding and conveying for himself and his heirs to Evert Pels his small dwelling and the land situated near the Rondout on the bank of the Esopus Kil, belonging under the jurisdiction of the village of Wildwyck, with all the obligations and privileges appertaining to the aforesaid land, by virtue of the grant made by the former vice-director Johannes Dyckman at the time residing at Fort Orange in the service of the Lord’s Directors of the privileged West India Company, dated Aug. 16, 1653, with the request that the said Evert Pels in the name of him, Christoffel Davids, shall obtain for said lands a deed from the hon. Lord Gov. Genl. Ridsert Nicolls. Wherefore he also grants him absolute power and authority to obtain the aforesaid deed. Promising to consider valid whatever he, Evert Pels, may have done regarding said affair in his name, and also nevermore to revoke the aforesaid conveyance and grant, neither by himself nor his heirs, nor to proceed nor to have proceeded against the same under obligations as per law, under condition that the conditions of sale of said lands and little house shall be complied with by Evert Pels, in accordance with the contract of sale of the same, dated Feb. 12/22, 1667. And therefore the appearer besides Roelof Swartwout and Gerret Fooken as witnesses invited and requested for the purpose, has subscribed to the present with his own hand at Wildwyck in the day and in the year named before. (Signed) the mark C D of Christoffel Davids, (signed) Roelof Swartwout, Gerret Foocken. In my presence, (signed) Mattheus Capito, Secretary.

Page 654, 20/30 Apr 1667
On this April 20/30, 1667, appeared before me, Mattheus Capito, Secretary of the village of Wildwyck, and the below-named witnesses the worthy persons, Evert Pels and Samuel Olivier having hired of the aforesaid lessor his dwelling with the land belonging to the same, as per the purchase of Christoffel Davids, situated on the Esopus Kil near the Rondout, for the period of one year. For which lease the lessee promises to pay the lessor 80 gldrs. in sewan or in grain, market price, the first half at the end of six months and the second half at the expiration of said lease. The lessor promises to set up 800 palisades as a fence around the land and to repair the house, providing the lessee be obliged to return said palisades after expiration of the lease. The repairs to the house, the building of a support and a chimney will be deducted from the rent by the lessor after expiration of the lessee’s lease, after a valuation of two good men.
 With which aforesaid agreement the appearers are satisfied, under promise of sincerely complying with the present, under obligations as per law. And on this account appearers, besides Roelof Swartwout and Jan Hendericksen as witnesses invited and requested for the purpose, have subscribed to the present with their own hand at Wildwyck on the day and in the year named before. (Signed) Evert Pels, Samuel Oliver. (Signed) Roelof Swartwout, Jan Heyndricksz. In my presence, (signed) Mattheus Capito, Secretary.

Source:  Versteeg, Dingman (trans.), New York Historical Manuscripts: Dutch, Kingston Papers, 2 vols., translated 1899, revised by Samuel Oppenheim 1912, and reprinted by Baltimore, MD:  Clearfield Co., 1999.

In addition to the above record, Evert Pels is mentioned, in Volume I, as a commissary, pages, 3-4, 6, 9-11, 14-5, 18, 21, 25, 28, 31, 41, 43, 45, 50, 54 56, 59-60, 65, 69, 137, and 331; as an attorney, pages 65, 193, 204, 210, 338, 342, and 345; as a curator, pages 120, 129-30, 136, 203, 224, 227-8, 278, and 339; as an appraiser, page 157; as an arbitrator, pages 159, 160, 163, 204, and 226; attested, page 195. In Volume II, he appears as an appraiser, pages 541; as an administrator, pages 549, 560, and 590; as a witness, pages 556, 563, 611, 702, and 714; as a schepen, pages 590, 592-3, and 642; as an attorney, pages 611-2; as a commissary, pages 629 and 631.


Page 43, 22:22

Remonstrance of Wildwyck Inhabitants to their Magistrates, Listing Maltreatment Inflicted by Soldiers.
…Thomas Chambrits Captain and overseer, and Everts Pels overseer, are hereby authorized, by the Court to acquaint Captain Broadhead, the answer of the Inhabitants, that Cornelis Barentsen Slecht by him Imprisoned, might be Relaxed, out of his Imprisonment, for to prevent further trouble and danger; and in Case the afore said Cornelis Barentsen Sleght, hath offended the said Captain Broadhead, that the said Broadhead (:according to the Governors Order:) Should sue him to the Court, for to be Examined and Corrected, dated in Wiltwyck this 4/14 of Feb. 1667.
Wm. Beeckman
Jan Joosten
Roelof Swartwout
 In answer to this abovestandinge, Captain Broadhead Replyes, that he will keep Cornelis Slegt in apprehension, as Longe as he thincks good, and in Case the Inhabitants will fetsh him by force, that he Would Waight uppon them, dated in Wiltwyck this 4/14 off Feb. 1667.
Thomas Chambrits
Evert pels

Pages 54-5, 22:30
An extract out of the Producall or Register of the Towne of Esopus,
 The wife of Cornelius Barnson Sleight and her daughter complained to the Court, that Capt Broadhead had grievously cut beate and wounded Cornelius Barndson her husband in his owne house and that hee had alsoe comitted his close confined to the guard, and would not release him,
 Upon which the Court ordered that the Courts messinger should bee sent, to request Capt Broadhead to come to the Court and said messinger recieved this following answer That if the Commissaryes would speake with him they might come to him, then the Burgers being in armes, the Court endeavored what in them lay to prevent any farther danger, and thereupon ordered that Capt Chambers and Evert Pelse to desire Capt Broadhead to release the said Burger from the Guard, and if the said Cornelius Barnson had any wise offended him, hee shold according to the Governours order complaine to the Majestrates, who would see that hee make satisfaccion or bee punished according to the merrit of his crime   But when the said 2 Comissaryes had delivered the message to Capt Broadhead, hee made them his answer that hee would keepe the said Cornelius as long as hee pleased, and if they would fetch him, hee would bee ready to wayte for them.
 The Court alsoe used many arguments to the Burgers that were in armes to goe quietly whome to their houses and went personally themselves to perswade them, that they should not doe any thing against the Melitie, but told them they would adress their cause to the honorable Governor
 Then the burgers told them the Magistrates that Captaine Broadhead and more of the Soldiers had many tymes threatned to burne the Towne and that with other reasons moved them to appeare in their armes and the(re)fore they requested to bee impowred by their majestrates to continew in their armes   But the said majestrates uterly denied the same.
[Endorsed:] The Court of Esopes Proceedings

Page 137, (about Mar 1670)

Register.
Of all the Lands Granted by the Authority of his R: H. lyeing within the Precincts of Kingston.
                                                                                                              Acres.             Rod
…Evert Pells………………………………………………………….180         =       …

Source:  Christoph, Peter R., New York Historical Manuscripts:  English, Vol XXII (Administrative Papers of Governor Richard Nicolls and Francis Lovelace, 1664-1673), Baltimore, MD, Genealogical Publishing Co., 1980.


The following is concerning the age of myself, JACOB AARTSEN, and also my wife, SARA PELS; also our marriage day, and the  birthdays of my sons and daughters:
1652, Feb 14 : I was born (old style)
1659, July 3 : My wife was born
1677, Feb 25 : I was married to my wife
1678, Sept 10 : Was born our first daughter, annatje, about 2 o'clock A.M.
1679, Oct 15 : Between Wednesday and Thursday, about midnight, our first son, AERDT, was born.
1681, April 12 : About one hour before sunrise on Tuesday, our second son, EVERT, was born.
1682, Nov 2 : Our third son, GERRIT, was born, about 7 in the morning.
1685, April 11 : Was born our second daughter, REBECKA, about 7 in the morning.
1686, Sept 1 : Was born our third daughter, GEERTJE, about 10 in the evening.
1688, April 4 : Was born our fourth daughter, JANNETJE, about 7 in the morning.
1689, April 10 : Was born our fifth daughter, JANNETJE, about 11 in the morning.
1691, Feb 5 : Was born our fourth son, GERRIT, about midnight.
1692, Nov 19 : Between Saturday and Sunday, about midnight, was born our fifth son, SYMON.
1695, Jan 5 : Our sixth son, JACOB, was born about 9 in the evening.
1696, Dec 28 : Our seventh son, BENJAMIN, was born, about 7 in the evening.
1699, Feb 5 : Our eighth son, ABRAHAM, was born between 1 and 2 o'clock in the morning.
1701, Dec 1 : Our sixth daughter, SARA, was born, between 1  and 2 o'clock in the morning.
1703, Aug 14 and 15 : Our ninth son, ISAAC, was born, about 12  o'clock at night.
1709, Nov 17 : Was my son, GERRIT, struck on his head by a limb or branch, which was torn by me from another, and died the 19th, on Saturday, about an hour and a half before sunset, and on Tuesday was buried here.

Source: Van Wagenen Family Bible, submitted by Patricia Van Wagenen Heffernan of Canton, GA, http://www.biblerecords.com/vanwagenen.html.


Footnotes

[1] Near the German-Polish border. Stettin is now Szczecin, Poland. Viginia Capenter Jansen stated that Evert was “possibly son of Ewalt Peltz, a brewer's servant at Stettin” (http://revolution.3-cities.com/~gjansen/westfall.htm#SIMONS2) but I have seen no documentation on this. That his father’s first name was Evert (or something close to it) is confirmed by the patronym of Everts that our Evert used, as recorded at his marriage. It is known that Evert had an uncle named Pieter Smit, who witnessed Evert and Jannetje’s wedding in Amsterdam. Whether, Pieter is an uncle in sense that he is his mother’s brother or one of his parent’s sister’s husband, is not known.
[2] The Amsterdam Birth, Marriage, and Burial Index shows the baptisms of a Jannetje to this couple. That, the aforementioned Jannetje is the one that married Evert Pels is supported by the fact that Evert Pels freed Jannetje’s sister, Marritje, from an indenture and Sijmon and Claertje are also found in the index as having had a daughter, Marritje, baptized, that Jannetje was attended by her mother, Claertje, at her wedding in Amsterdam, and that Jannetje and Marritje have the patronym of Simons (implying that her father was named Simon (Sijmon)).
[3] On the settlement at Wiltwyck, later known as Kingston, New York, the following was written, “A settlement had been started in May 1658 and on account of the danger from the hostile Esopus Indians it was necessary to live within a stockade. Many of the pioneers who settled in Wiltwyck came from the manor of Rensselaerwyck which was ruled over by a Patroon. As the chief magistrate of his estate there were no appeals from the decree of his court. His tenants could not hunt and fish without his permission, they must grind their grain at his mill and were reduced to vassals under his domination. It was to escape such conditions that the freedom loving Dutch were establishing villages where there were no such restrictions. A court was instituted in Wiltwyck in 1660 and Evert Pels, old time friend of Jillis Fonda, became the first Schepen. In the same year a church was organized and the following year a house was erected for Dominie Blom, the new pastor. Each land owner was assessed to pay toward the support of the church according to the value of his land.”  (Source:  “A Career Woman in 17th Century New York”, New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, July 1964, Vol. XCV, No. 3. The article is about Hester Jans, wife of Jillis Fonda.)
[4]  Listed on the New Amsterdam church membership lists on 30 May 1678, is found the following:  “Brechtie Elswaert, wede. v. (widower of) Evert Pels” (Source: Selyns records: 't Ledematen-Boeck oft Register der Ledematen alhier 't sedert de jare 1649. (Member book or register of members here beginning in the year 1649), FHL Film 1927968.
[5] In 1687, Arian Rose Alberson and Maria Ever Pels had a daughter, Annetje, baptized (#544). Their eldest daughter was Jannetje and their second eldest son was Evert, indicating that Maria was indeed the daughter of Evert Pels and Jannetje Sijmons (by way of the Dutch naming tradition). There are several members of the Evert Pels family acting as sponsors for the family of Arien Roosa and Maria Pels.
[6] In the 1693 baptism of their son, Johannes, Elisabet and Joch are recorded as “Jochum Van Namen” and “Lysbeth Pels”.
[7] Her second eldest son was named Evert (Kingston baptism #214). This strongly indicates that her father was named Evert. While neither her first or second daughters were named Jannetje, she did have a daughter (third) named after her mother (#566). A number of the members of the Evert Pels family were witnesses at her children’s baptisms.
[8] In 1692, Gerrit Aartsen and Claartje Eversen had a daughter Neeltje baptized (#708). Gerrit Aartze and Clara Pels had daughter Jannetie baptized in 1682 (#269). The use of the names Eversen and Pels indicates that Claartje is Evert Pels’ daughter. In addition, the use of the name Jannetie for their eldest daughter hints that Jannetje Sijmons was Claartje’s mother.
[9] In “Records of the Reformed Dutch Church of Albany, New York, 1683–1809”, excerpted from the Year Books of the Holland Society of New York, under the year 1684, is found:  “Apr. 9. Hieronimus Hansz, y.m., of New Albany, and Rebecka Evertsz, y.d., living here.” Whether or not this is Rebecca Pels is questionable. Some researchers believe that aforementioned “Rebecka Evertsz” is a Pels, while others believe that she is actually Rebecca Fluyt.
[10] uyt t’Stift vol. According to a contract in volume 3, folio 135a, the bishopric of Vol lies in Hessenlant. It is probable, therefore, that Fulda is intended.
[11] Note from Van Laer:  “Revised from Doc. Rel. to Col. Hist. N.Y., 13:90-91.”
[12] Note from editor of Doc. Hist. of NY:  “An Algonkin word meaning, ‘Friend.’ ED.”
[13] King Charles II of England annexed New Netherland as a British colony in March 1664, granting it to the Duke of York. Governor Stuyvesant handed over control of New Amsterdam that September. MB
[14] Note from Versteeg:  “Beaten in the sense of having lost the case.”


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Last updated 2 Aug 2004.