Anthony De Hooges and Eva Albertsz Bradt

    Anthony de Hooges was baptized 14 Dec 1620 in the Nieuwkerk (New Church), Amsterdam, North Holland, Netherlands, the son of Johannes de Hooges and Maria Tijron[1] Anthony left for the colony of Rensselaerwyck in New Netherland in 1641 on "der Connick David". Anthony had been sent to Rensselaerwyck as the assistant to Arent van Curler and later became the Secretary of the Colony. Kiliaen Van Rensselaer, the patron, seems to have had a great deal of concern and respect for Anthony.
    Anthony married Eva Albertsz Bradt. Eva was baptized 9 January 1633 in Amsterdam, North Holland, Netherlands. She was the daughter of Albert Adriessen Bradt and Annetje Barents Van Rottmer. She arrived at New Amsterdam with her family in 1637 on the "Rensselaerwyck". Eva had five younger brothers, Barent, Storm (Vanderzee), Adries, Jan, Dirk, and two younger sisters, Engeltje and Gisseltje. Anthony is believed to have died on or about 11 October 1655. Eva married second Roeloff Swartwout 13 August 1657 in Albany, Albany, New York. Roeloff became the Sheriff of the Esopus in 1660. Eva must have died before 22 Nov 1691 because Roeloff is found remarrying in Bergen, New Jersey then.

Anthony and Eva had [2]:

1. Maria (Maricken) de Hooges, believed to have married 1) Hendrick Bries and 2) Jacob Lookermans 21Aug 1696 in Albany, New York.
2. Anna (Anneken) de Hooges, married Warnaar Hornbeck. [3]
3. Catrina de Hooges, married Harmen Rutgers. [4]
4. Johannes de Hooges, married Margarita Post 4 December 1675 in Kingston, Ulster, New York.
5. Eleanora de Hooges, born in Rensselaerwyck, New Netherland, married Willem Monjeur de la Montagne [5] 19 May 1673 in Kingston, Ulster, New York.

Roeloff and Eva had:

6. Thomas Swartwout, no baptismal record [6], married Lysbeth Gardenier.
7. Antoni Swartwout, baptized 8 Jan 1662 at Kingston, Ulster, New York, probably died young.
8. Antoni Swartwout, baptized 11 May 1664 in Kingston, Ulster, New York, married Jannetje Coobes. [7]
9. Hendrickje Swartwout, no baptismal record [8], married Huibert Lambertsen 16 March 1679 at Hurley, Ulster, New York.
10. Cornelia Swartwout, baptized 13 March 1667 in Kingston, Ulster, New York, married Hendrick Klaesen Schoonhoven [9].
11. Rachel Swartwout, no baptismal record, married Jacob Kip. [10]
12. Bernardus Swartwout, baptized 26 Apr 1673 in Kingston, Ulster, New York, married Rachel Schepmoes 19 May 1700 in Kingston, Ulster, New York.

Also said to be a child of Roeloff and Eva but without strong primary evidence:
13. Eva Swartwout, no baptismal record, married Jacob Dingman 9 Oct 1698 in Kingston, Ulster, New York.

Sources:
1. Baptisms in the Evangelical Lutheran Church, Amsterdam, 1590-1641, FHL Film 113415.
2. Hoes, Roswell Randall (comp.), Baptismal and Marriage Registers of the Old Dutch Church of Kingston, Ulster County, New York, Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1997 (originally published by De Vinne Press (New York), 1891).
3. Selyns records: 't Ledematen-Boeck oft Register der Ledematen alhier 't sedert de jare 1649. (Member book or register of members here beginning in the year 1649) FHL Film 1927968.
4. Marriage Contract of Roeloff Swartwout and Eva Albertson, 13 August 1657 at Fort Orange.
5. Bergen DRC Marriages - Holland Society Yearbook 1914.
6. O'Callahan, E. B. (comp.), Laws and Ordinances of New Netherland, 1638-1674, 1868, pg. 414.
7. de Laporte, Helen Reed, "Anthony de Hooges, A Charming Personality", Olde Ulster Magazine, Vol. VI, August 1910, No. 8, pgs. 240-245.
8. "Whales Sighted at Fort Orange", Excerpt from the Memorandum Book of Anthony de Hooges, Box 31, "Van Rensselaer Manor Papers", in possession of the Manuscripts and Special Collections of the New York State Library, reprinted on the New Netherland Project's Documents website, Albany, NY: http://www.nnp.org/documents/whale.html, transcribed and translated in 2001.
9. Gumaer, Peter E. (1771-1869), A History of Deerpark in Orange County, N. Y., (written between 1858 and 1862), Port Jervis, NY: Minisink Valley Historical Society, published 1890, pgs. 30, 181-2.
10. O'Callahan, E. B. (comp.), Laws and Ordinances of New Netherland, 1638-1674, 1868, pg. 414.
11. O'Callaghan, E.B., History of New Netherland; or, New York under the Dutch, Vol. I, New York: D. Appleton & Co., 1855.
12. Alb. Rec. xix., 125-131, cited in O'Callaghan, E.B., History of New Netherland; or, New York under the Dutch, Vol. II, New York: D. Appleton & Co., 1855, p. 437.
13. Fernow, Berthold (ed.), Records of New Amsterdam from 1653 to 1674 Anno Domini, Vol. III, Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1976.


Baptisms, Evangelical Lutheran Church, Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Baptism Date Child Va (Father) Test (Witnesses)
1633 Affien Alberdt Andriesen Barendt Barendtz,
9 Jan Jan Hael,
Niesien Harmens,
Aeltien Jans.

Source: Baptisms in the Evangelical Lutheran Church, Amsterdam, 1590-1641, FHL Film 113415.


Records of Baptisms of the Reformed Church at Kingston, Ulster, NY.

Page Number Baptism Number Baptism Date Parents Child Witnesses
2 12 1662 Roeloff Swartwout Antoni Toomes Swartwout.
8 Jan. Evaa Swartwouts Aart Martensen Doorn.
Tryntje Tyssen.
Jacoomyntje Slecht.
3 37 1664 Roeloff Swartwout Antoni Evert Pels.
11 May Eva Alberts Gysbert van Imbroek.
Gissel Alberts.
Maria de Hoges.
6 81 1667 Roeloff Swartwout Cornelia Cornelis Slecht.
13 March Eva Swartwout Jannetje Pels.
Willempje Jacobs.
Thomes Loodewycksen.
Geesje Barents.
8 120 1673 Roelof Swartwout Barnardus Hendrick Briest.
26 April Eefjen (surname not given) Rudolfus Swartwout.
Hilletie Storms.
Sara Provoost.
Jacomeyna Swartwouts.

Kingston Marriage Register.

Page 503, Marriage # 30
1673 (Date of marriage not given)
W. MONTAGNE, and HELENORA DE HOOGES, the latter born in the Colony of Rensselaerswyck. Banns recorded, 19 May.

Page 503, Marriage # 31
4 Dec. 1675
31 JOHANNES DE HOOGES, j. m., and MARGARITA POST, j. d. Banns recorded, 17 Nov., with consent of his Father and Mother, and with consent of her Father. "Married after three lawful publications in the church."

Page 504, Marriage # 37
16 March 1679
HUIBERT LAMBERTSEN, j.m., of Wageninghen, [11] in Gelderlandt (Gelderland), and HENDRICKJE SWARTWOUT, j. d., from Nieu Albanien (New Albany), [12] both resid. in Horley (Hurley), and married in Horley. First publication of Banns, 21 Feb.

Page 514, Marriage # 137
9 Oct. 1698
JACOB DINGEMANS, j. m., born at the Kindhoel (Kinderhook), and resid. there, and EVA SWARTWOUD, j. d., born in Horle (Hurley), and resid. there. Banns published, but dates not given.

Page 515, Marriage # 157
19 May 1700
BERNARDUS SWARTWOUD, j. m., born in Kingstouwn, and resid. in Horle (Hurley), and RACHEL SCHEPMOES, j. d., born in Kingstouwn, and resid. there. Banns published, but dates not given.

Source: Hoes, Roswell Randall (comp.), Baptismal and Marriage Registers of the Old Dutch Church of Kingston, Ulster County, New York, Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1997 (originally published by De Vinne Press (New York), 1891).


Note of Hand to the Deacons of the Church of Rensselaerswyck, Anno 1647.

I, the undersigned, Anthonie de Hooges, have, on the part of the Noble Patroon of the Colonie Rensselaerswyck, borrowed from the Diaconie of the aforesaid place, for the term of one year, to be repaid in cash, at the option of the lenders, with ten per cent. interest per annum, the sum of three hundred guilders in seawan, whereof one hundred and twenty is in ordinary seawan, promising thankfully to produce at the aforesaid time, in stated specie aforesaid, to the Diaconie of the aforesaid place.
In testimony whereof, have I subscribed this Acte with mine own hand. Actum R. Wyck, 9th May, 1647.
Source: O'Callaghan, E.B., History of New Netherland; or, New York under the Dutch, Vol. I, New York: D. Appleton & Co., 1855, p. 471


Fort Orange stood at the lower part of what is now Market-street, nearly midway between Denisson and Lydius streets. The Patroon's trading-house was on the north side of the fort, on the verge of the moat by which the latter was surrounded. This trading-house disappeared some time previous to 1649, when the ground on which it stood was leased for " a garden" to Pieter Hertgers and Anthony de Hooges, at a rent of one guilder, or 40 cents, a year.

Source: O'Callaghan, E.B., History of New Netherland; or, New York under the Dutch, Vol. I, New York: D. Appleton & Co., 1855, p. 331


"De Hooges, Anthonie, a lot, Berverwyck, 23 April 1652."

Source: "Dutch Land Grants, 1630-1664", O'Callaghan, E.B., History of New Netherland; or, New York under the Dutch, Vol. I, New York: D. Appleton & Co., 1855, p. 587


"Their worships, the Commissioners and Council of the colonie of Rensselaerswyck, having duly considered and weighed the demand of the Honorable Director, as prosecutor against Willem Juriaensen Bakker, and finding that he was already banished out the colonie by their Worshipful Court, on the 4th February, 1644: and afterwards because that he attempted on the Lord's highway with a knife to stab the person of Antonie de Hooges, then commis to the Noble Patroon, whereby he, in as much as in him lay, did commit a murder, for which he, on the 28th August, 1647, was banished from the colonie; and he having by petition prayed for a respite, which was granted to him, he pledged all his goods, and also subjected himself to the banishment of his person, should he happen to insult any person within or without the court, or to do any thing that should be displeasing, or worthy of punishment...WHEREFORE, he being a blasphemer, a street-scold, a murderer as far as his intentions are concerned, a defamer, a contemner of law and justice, and a disturber of the public peace, their Worships of the court aforesaid have adjudged and sentenced, as they do hereby sentence and adjudge, that the aforesaid sentence of banishment shall stand fast, and he, Willem Juriaensen. is hereby banished out the district and jurisdiction of this colonie, from now henceforth and forever, to leave by the first Vessel and never more to return, on pain of corporal punishment: ill with costs of cottrt. This sentenced, &c., in College, this 18th July, 1050, to the knowledge of me,
"A. DE HOOGES, Secretary."

From "First Settlers of Rensselaerwyck", O'Callaghan, E.B., History of New Netherland, Vol. I, 1855.


Alb. Rec. xix., 125-131. Roeloff, son of Thomas Swartwout married, 13th August, 1657, at Fort Orange, Eva Albertsen, daughter of Albert Andriessen Bradt, and relict of Anthony de Hooges, secretary of Rensselaerswyck. (See Vol. I., p. 433.)

Source: O'Callaghan, E.B., History of New Netherland; or, New York under the Dutch, Vol. II, New York: D. Appleton & Co., 1855, p. 437


Excerpt from It's About Time, Vol. IV,
by Bill DeCoursey, New Brighton, Minnesota, 2000.

On 13 August 1657 at Fort Orange, in the marriage agreement between Roelof SWARTWOUT and Eva Albertsen BRADT, widow of Anthonie de HOOGES, the bride serves for each of her children with her former husband, Marichen, Anneken, Catrina, Johanis and Eleanora de HOOGES, one hundred guilden each. Roelof SWARTWOUT and his bride moved to Esopus in Ulster County, New York, where he was the first sheriff.
Marinus Schoonmaker, HISTORY OF KINGSTON, NEW YORK (1888), p.489;
John O. Evjen, SCANDINAVIAN IMMIGRANTS IN NEW YORK (1916), pp.30-33.

"In the name of the Lord Amen, be it known by the contents of this present instrument, that in the year 1657, on the 13th day of the month of August, appeared before me Johannes La MONTAGNE, in the service of the General Privileged West India Company, deputy at Fort Orange and village of Beverwyck, Roeloff SWARTWOUT, in the presence of his father, tomas SWARTWOUT, on the..., and Eva ALBERTSEN (BRATT), widow of the late Antony de HOOGES, in the presence of Albert ANDRIESSEN (BRATT), her father of the other side, who in the following manner have covenanted this marriage contract, to wit, that for the honor of God the said Roeloff SWARTWOUT and Eva ALBERTSEN after the manner of the Reformed religion respectively held by them shall marry; secondly, that the said married people shall contribute and bring together all their estates, personal and real, of whatsoever nature they may be, to be used by them in common, according to the custom of Holland, except that the bride, Eva ALBERTSE, in presence of the orphanmasters, recently chosen, to wit, Honorable Jan VERBEECK and Evert WENDELS, reserves for her a hundred guilders, to wit, for Maricken, Anneken, Catrina, Johannes, and Eleanora de HOOGES, for which sum of one hundred guilders for each child respectively (she) mortgages her house and lot, lying here in the village of Beverwyck; it was also covenanted, by these presents, by the mutual consent of the aforewritten married people, that Barent ALBERTSE (BRATT) and Teunis SLINGERLAND, brother and brother-in-law of the said Eva ALBERTSE, and uncle of said children, should be guardians of said children, to which the aforesaid orphanmasters have consented; which above written contract the respective parties promise to hold good, etc. --- "Done in Fort Orange, ut supra in the presence of Pieter JACOBSEN and Johannes PROVOST, witnesses, for that purpose called.
"Roeloff SWARTWOUT, (x) Eva ALBERTSE, Thomas SWARTWOUT,
"Albert ANDRIESSEN, Jan VERBEECK, Evert WENDEL, "Teunis CORNELISSEN
"Witnesses: Johanes PROVOOST, (+) Pieter JACOBSEN
"Acknowledged before me, La MONTAGNE, Deputy at Fort Orange."


From Volume III, Pg. 30, Tuesday, 26 Aug: 1659:

Roelof Swartwout, pltf. v/s Lysbet Tysen, deft. Pltf. says that the deft. has an obligation against Anthony de Hooges, his predecessor, saying the same is paid which being shewn in Court, looked over and examined, was found to have been paid according to receipt signed by the deft.

Source: Fernow, Berthold (ed.), Records of New Amsterdam from 1653 to 1674 Anno Domini, Vol. III, Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1976.


From the Kingston (Wiltwyck/Esopus) Tax List
(to defray the cost of building the Dominie's house),
12 November 1661:

"Roeloff Swartwout, tenant on the bouwery of Jacob Janse Stol's widow, containing 43 morgens...90 florins"
Source: O'Callahan, E. B. (comp.), Laws and Ordinances of New Netherland, 1638-1674, 1868, pg. 414.


1691, 22 Nov;
Roelof Swartwout (wid. of Eva Albers); Francyntje Andries (wid. of Ab. Lubbers)

Source: Bergen DRC Marriages - Holland Society Yearbook 1914.


Anthony de Hooges, A Charming Personality
By Helen Reed de Laporte, Olde Ulster Magazine, Vol. VI, August 1910, No. 8, pgs. 240-245.

Probably there is no more picturesque a personality in all the colonial records than Anthonij de Hooges. We first learn of him in 1641when he entered the employ of Rensselaerwyck, sailing on den Coninck David, the skipper being commanded to allow him to eat and sleep in the cabin. He brought letters of introduction to William Kieft, Director-General, and also to Arent van Curler to whom he was sent as an assistant.

He kept a journal of his long voyage for the patron. It begins: " In the year of our Lord 1641, the 30th of July, I commenced this journal in the name of the Lord. May the Lord conduct us to the place of our destination in order that on our arrival we may offer to the Lord the offering of our lips to His honor and our salvation. Amen."
They had an unusually stormy passage. He closes his journal saying: "At daybreak we ran to the sand point (Sandy Hook) and we rounded it too close. We got aground on a reef which had formed there within a year. After two hours we got afloat again. God be praised we suffered no damage and with good speed passed between the Hoofden (the headlands at the sides of the Narrows) and in the afternoon came to qanchor at the Manhatens, in front of Smits Vly (on the East River). Thus the Lord delivered us at last, after much adversity, for which He be praised forever, Amen. The next day a dead horse overboard.
(Endorsed)
"Journal of Anthony de Hooges, of his voyage to New Netherland beginning 30 July ending 29 November 1641."

One year later Kiliaen van Rensselaer writes him that the journal had been received and had given him great satisfaction. The letter is filled with advice and van Rensselaer evidently felt a great interest in him. "In the beginning," he writes, "hear and see, notice and learn, obey and make yourself agreeable and liked; in that way you will be able to accomplish much." That he considers his counsel worth seeking was shown by a letter to Domine Megapolensis urging him "to confer sometimes with de Hooges and extract the quintessence of his discourse."
Van Curler, De Hooges' superior officer, was somewhat dissipated and, going from bad to worse, all his papers were turned over to de Hooges. Then van Rensselaer writes again to Domine Megapolensis: "Every effort ought to be made to stop the excessive drinking and now that there is a public brewer (Evert Pels) I hope that private brewing will cease. I hope that Anthony de Hooges will conduct himself well. What I fear most for him is that he may become strongly addicted to drink against which he must be strongly warned. His sweetheart here in the Netherlands, Anneken Sporom, married at Campen so that he need not wait for her any longer. I have sometimes thought that his thoughts were too much concentrated on her and that he liked the country less on that account. You may tell him this when there is an opportunity or have someone else tell him in order that he may be at ease...Let him behave well and have patience and he will be advanced in due time."
That he stood high in the opinion of van Rensselaer a letter to van Curler shows for he told the latter "not to lightly reject the advice of Hooges although he is younger than you and so experienced. I consider him an upright young man. March 18, 1643, the patron writes to de Hooges:
"I have your letters of the first of March and the 23th of August of last year, 1642...I have recommended you well, as you will learn from de Megapolensis, but I must admonish you to be righteous and faithful and especially to guard yourself drunkenness and lewd women. There are many rumors current about the first, but you can best test the matter yourself; heed the faithful admonitions of your pastor, de Megapolensis, and do not follow the footsteps of those who may be guilty thereof, but fear the Lord; do right and fear no one. You will do well to keep and send me a daily journal, giving a truthful account of affairs, for I have no use for things that are not true...I hope that you will have more and more satisfaction; all new things are difficult but matters will turn out to your advantage if you conduct yourself well. I must thank you for communicating to me the text of the first sermon of de Megapolensis; no other foundation can and ought to be laid. Vale."
The position of De Hooges was a responsible one. He was commissioner and administrator of goods suitable for merchandise and was to pay the laborers. We find him leasing farms and making contracts for buildings. From the departure of van Curler for Holland October 1, 1646 until the arrival of Brant Aertz van Slichtenhorst March 22, 1648, he was entrusted with the business management of the colony. In a petition for the payment of his salary he states that he must have a house built for him.


"A certain fish of considerable size, snow-white in color, round in the body, and blowing water out of its head," made at the same time his appearance, March stemming the impetuous flood. What it portended, "God the Lord only knew." All the inhabitants were lost in wonder, for " at the same instant that this fish appeared to us, we had the first thunder and lightning this year." The public astonishment had scarcely subsided, when another monster of the deep, estimated at forty feet in length, was seen, of a brown color, having fins on his back, and ejecting water in like manner, high in the air. Some seafaring people, "who had been to Greenland," now pronounced the strange visitor a whale. Intelligence was shortly after received that it had grounded on an island at the mouth of the Mohawk, and the people turned out in numbers to secure the prize, which was, forthwith, subjected to the process of roasting, in order to extract its oil. Though large quantities were obtained, yet so great was the mass of blubber, the river was covered with grease for three weeks afterwards, and the air infected to such a degree with the stench, as the fish lay rotting on the strand, that the smell was perceptibly offensive for two (Dutch) miles to leeward. The whale, which had first ascended the river, stranded, on its return to sea, on an island some forty miles from the mouth of the river, near which place four others grounded, also, this year.
...These particulars are taken from an old book kept by Antonie de Hooges, Secretary of Rensselaerswyck, endorsed, "Copye van eenige acten ende andere aenmerckelycke notitien," and from Van der Donck's Beschryv. van N. N. The island at the mouth of the Mohawk goes since by the name of Walvisch, or Whale Island. De Hooges refers to the visit of a similar large fish " many years ago," which caused great wonder at the time, but he does not mention the year, nor furnish any further particulars of the circumstance.

Source: O'Callaghan, E.B., History of New Netherland; or, New York under the Dutch, Vol. I, New York: D. Appleton & Co., 1855, p. 346-7.

For the full account in Dutch from Anthony's Memorandum Book, along with an English translation, go to the New Netherland Project's Documents website, at http://www.nnp.org/documents/whale.html


More Information on Thomas, Anthony, and Bernardus Swartwout,
Sons of Eva Alberts Bradt

In the year 1690, as near as can be determined, Jacob Cuddeback, Thomas Swartwout, Anthony Swartwout, Bernardus Swartwout, Peter Gumaer, John Tyse and David Jamison, settled in the present town of Deerpark, in the County of Orange and State of New York, on and near a handsome knoll or hill contiguous to a spring brook and a spring of living water, in the central part of the Peenpack flats...
Very little is now known respecting the seven first pioneers. I imagine that they had all been in comfortable circumstances of life, and had become reduced so that they were in want of means for a livelihood, and became associated to obtain possession of some good land which they were not able to purchase in the settled part of the country, and had to venture to emigrate into its wilds which remained unsettled by white people but was inhabited by Indians, who at that time were thought to be a more savage and cruel people than what they in reality were.
The three Swartwouts, we have reason to presume, were best calculated for this enterprise, and that their companions must have had much reliance on them for protection. Not only were they possessed of superior capacities in respect of body and spirit for adventurous undertakings, but also were a very social, jocose, humorous and witty people, well calculated to become easily familiarized with strangers and court friendship, which first qualities were necessary to intimidate the Indians, and the latter to court and maintain friendship with them. They were an easy people and made no great exertions to acquire property by means of hard labor, but provided for a good living.

Source: Gumaer, Peter E. (1771-1869), A History of Deerpark in Orange County, N. Y., (written between 1858 and 1862), Port Jervis, NY: Minisink Valley Historical Society, published 1890, pgs. 30, 181-2.


Footnotes

[1] That Johannes de Hooges and Maria Tijron are Anthony’s parents is confirmed when one considers the Dutch naming custom that was often used. If Anthony and Eva used this tradition, their eldest son would be named after Anthony’s father and their eldest daughter would be named after Anthony’s mother, as is the case here. Other children in Anthony’s family bear the same names as those in Johannes’ family.
[2] I have no baptismal records for Anthony and Eva's children. My source is the marriage contract between Roeloff Swartwout and Eva Albertsen (widow of Anthony de Hooges), 13 August 1657 at Fort Orange, which mentions Maricken, Anneken, Catrina, Johannes, and Eleanora de Hooges as children.
[3] Warnaar and Anna are found having children baptized in the Kingston RDC: Baptismal # 116 (Eva, 18 Jun 1671), 223 (Sara, 24 Apr 1681), 338 (Johannes, 9 Dec 1683), 418 (Johannes, 3 May 1685), and 555 (Maria, 19 Feb 1688).
[4] On 3 Sept 1696, Harmen and Catrina were placed on the membership list of New Amsterdam Dutch Reformed Church: "Harmen Rutgers, en syn huysvr. (and his wife) Catharina de Hooges. met Attest. van N. Albanien. (with a certificate from New Albany)" Source: Selyns records: 't Ledematen-Boeck oft Register der Ledematen alhier 't sedert de jare 1649. (Member book or register of members here beginning in the year 1649) FHL Film 1927968.
[5] Listed only as W. Montagne in the marriage record. On 21 Jul 1674, Willem Monjeur de la Montagne and Leonora de Hooges had a daughter Ragel baptized in the Kingston RDC (Baptismal # 124).
[6] Thomas' records have not been found. According to the naming tradition, however, Roeloff's first son would probably be named Thomas, after his father (see Marriage Contract of Roeloff Swartwout and Eva Albertson). In addition, a Thomas, Anthony, and Bernardus Swartwout were among the pioneer settlers of what is now Deerpark, Orange, New York (the Machackemeck Patant). As for his marriage, Thomas and Lysbeth are found having children baptized in the Kingston RDC: Baptismal # 447 (Josyna, 24 Jan 1686), 612 (Roulof, 24 Feb 1689), 825 (Eva, 16 Nov 1694), 955 (Rudolphus, 28 Mar 1697), 1107 (Jesyntje, 13 Aug 1699), 1292 (Samuel, 22 Jan 1702). Thomas Swartwout and Lysbet Jacobz Hovenier's son, Roelof was baptized 4 Feb 1683 (I am unsure whether or not Lysbeth Gardenier and Lysbeth Hovenier are the same person.)
[7] On 19 Jan 1701, Anthony's widow remarried in Kingston, Ulster, New York: "HEROMANDUS BERENSTSEN, born in Nimwegen, and resid. here (in Kingston), and JANNETJE COOBES, widow of ANTONIE SWARTWOUT, born in Renselaarswyck. Banns published, but dates not given." (p. 516, marriage # 166)
[8] Hendrickje and Huibert's second son was named Roelof (Kingston DRC baptismal # 366) and the eldest (and perhaps only) daughter was named Eva (Kingston # 649). This supports the idea that Hendrickje was the daughter of Roeloff Swartwout and Eva Bradt. In addition, Roeloff's mother is said to be Hendrickje, daughter of Barent Otsen, making the traditional choice for the name of Roeloff's eldest daughter, Hendrickje.
[9] In 1715, Cornelia's widower registered banns: "HENDRIK KLAASZ SCHOONHOOVEN, widower of CORNELIA SWARTWOUD, and WILLEMJEN DE LANGE, widow of THEUNIS KOOL, born in Kingstown. Banns registered, 4 Dec. 'Withdrawn the same day.'" (p. 531, marriage # 340)
[10] Rachel and Jacob had children baptized in the Kingston DRC: Baptismal # 892 (Isack, 9 Feb 1696), 1005 (Roelof, 31 Oct 1697), 1313 (Johannes, 3 May 1702), 1638 (Eva, 15 Apr 1707), 1803 (Maria, 18 Sep 1709), 2197 (Abraham, 24 Jan 1714). The fact that they named their second son Roelof and their first daughter Eva supports the idea that Rachel was a daughter of Roeloff Swartwout and Eva Bradt.
[11] Note from R. R. Hoes: "The present Wageninge or Wageningen, on the Rhine, in Province of Gelderland, Holloand, 11 miles west of Arnhem."
[12] Note from R. R. Hoes: "The present Albany, N. Y."


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