WILLIAM HENRY GREEN
 


 
 
 

William Henry Green was born 1 January 1809 in Wolverhampton, Staffordshire, England, the son of John Green and Sarah Meredith. He was christened in the parish of St. Bartholomew, Penn on February 5 1809: "William son of John and Sarah Green, Feb 5". William's parents had an older son, John, who had died before William was born. Penn is described in the 1851 History, Gazetteer and Directory of Staffordshire as "Penn is a large parish, comprising 3890 acres, and the two townships and villages of Upper and Lower Penn, the former of which has 716 and the latter 226 inhabitants. The Duke of Sutherland is lord of the manor, and owner of a large portion of the soil. The rest belongs to the following resident freeholders, JW Sparrow, Esq, of Penn Hall; the Rev William Dalton, of Lloyd House; Robert Thacker, Esq, of Muchall Hall; Sidney Cartwright, Esq, of the Leasowes, and a few smaller owners. Upper or Over Penn is a large pleasant village on the Stourbridge road, two miles S by W of Wolverhampton, containing Penn Hall, and several other neat mansions, and commanding extensive prospects of the surrounding country. Lower Penn is a small irregularly built village, near the canal, two miles W of Upper Penn, and nearly four miles WSW of Wolverhampton."  No other children for John and Sarah have been found. At some point, the Green family moved back to the parish of Claverley, Shropshire, where John and Sarah had been married.
 

William's mother, Sarah, died in April of 1830 in Claverley. Later that year, William married Mary Bennett Thomason in on 20 July 1830 in Kingswinford, Staffordshire. A few weeks later, William's father, John, died in Claverley in August of 1830.
 

The parish register for Kingswinford shows:

William Green, of this parish, and Mary Thomason, of this parish, were married in this church by banns, with consent of ________ this twentieth day of July in the year one thousand eight hundred and thirty, by me, Edward Davies, Curate.

                                                                     William Green, his mark
                                                                     Mary Thomason
In the presence of: Ann Embry
                              William Bennett, his mark

Source: Kingswinford parish register, FHL# 435779
 

Mary was twelve years older than William at the time of her marriage, and had an seven-year-old daughter, Sarah. William was 21 years old when he married the 33 year-old Mary. They settled in the townland of Farmcott, in the parish of Claverley, Shropshire. The Henson Walker Genealogy states: “Although several years his senior, Mary proved to be a very capable and efficient helpmate. A small cottage of rough lumber located in the market town of Claverley, in the All Saints parish, was the first abode shared by William and Mary. William, a common laborer, earned his daily bread by the sweat of his brow. Mary, young and industrious, added comfort and refinement to their home and surrounding. In times of scarcity, even though William worked fourteen hours a day as a farm laborer, his income was small.” A son, Samuel, was born to them in 1831. Another boy, John, was born three years later, in 1834. A daughter, Mary, was born in 1838, followed by another girl, Hannah, in 1841. William's occupation is listed on his daughters' birth certificates as an agricultural labourer.
 

The family is found in the 1841 English census in the townland of Farmcott, in the parish of Claverley:

Name                                               Age                         Occupation                      Born in this county?
William  Green                                   30                             Ag. Lab.                                    Y
Mary       "                                        40                                                                               Y
Samuel    "                                          9                                                                               Y
John        "                                          6                                                                               Y
Mary       "                                          3                                                                               Y
Hannah    "                                          2 months                                                                  Y
Edward Bennett                                 40                            Ag. Lab.                                     Y
Eliza          "                                        7                                                                               Y

Source: 1841 census, Claverly, FHL# 474583
 

It appears that Mary's brother, Edward is living with the Green family, along with his daughter, Eliza. Both Edward and William were agricultural laborers on the farm of Vincent Edwards, a yeoman farmer of Farmcott. The listing under Mr. Edwards' farm includes six agricultural laborers, one male servant, and two female servants. Altogether, six families are included under the Vincent's farm, for a total of 26 people. The townland of Farmcott includes 191 people.
 

As the Green children grew they went to work to help support the family. At the age of five, daughter Mary attended the village school three months out of the year, and learned to read and write. At the age of nine, she worked three days a week, for 12-hour shifts at a cotton mill five miles away. Samuel and John found work in Gloucestershire and Staffordshire.
 

The greatest change in the family came in about 1849. They came in contact with missionaries of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, and were baptized. Later, Samuel and John were baptized, 5 November 1851. Hannah's baptism date is unknown. (Some family records place the Green family in the Studham or Kensworth branches in Hertfordshire. However, they are not found in the LDS branch records for that time, and these locations are a considerable distance from the other known homes of the Greens. There is a William Green in the branch, but he is recorded as being married to Susannah Hews Green. They had a young daughter, Amy. This family is shown as moving to Watford in November, 1853. There is also a Mary Green in the records, but she is not married.  Source: LDS Record of Members, 1837-1858, Bedfordshire Conference, FHL# 086979. Also, the Green family is found still in Claverley parish in the 1851 census.)
 

The Green family appears in the English census in Farmcote, Claverley parish in 1851, and an LDS missionary was staying with the family:

Wm Green, head, married, 42, Farm laborer, born Staffordshire, Penn
Mary Green, wife, married, 54, Farm laborer wife, born Birmingham
John Green, son, unmarried, 16, Farm servant, born Salop, Claverley
Mary Green, daughter, unmarried, 13, ", "
Hannah Green, daughter, unmarried, 10, ", "
John Kelly, visitor, married, 26, Latter Day Saint Minister, born Scotland

Perhaps this is the missionary who baptized family members.
 

The family saved their money to come to Zion. In December of 1852 they left their little grey stone cottage on McRowan Street in Worcestershire to travel to Liverpool. “Arriving at Liverpool, William deposited six thousand shillings to pay for their transportation to America. After making all arrangements, they were told the sea was rough and dangerous and that no ships would sail until the middle of January, which was more than two weeks away. The only thing William could do was rent a small place and wait.” (Henson Walker Genealogy)
 

The family was assigned to the Ellen Maria, but at the last moment the captain told them that only Samuel could go. He sold his ticket, and waited with the family. They prepared to sail on the Golconda, but were transferred to the Elvira Owen. They finally set sail on 15 February 1853. 345 Saints traveled under the leadership of Joseph W. Young. Excerpts from the journal of the Elvira Owen show:

Ship list Green family

Elvira Owen ship's passenger list for the Green family

 

William Henry Green        age 43      laborer

Mary Bennett Green              57
Samuel Green                         21
John  Green                           18
Mary Green                           14
Hannah Green                        11

 

The address of the William Henry Green family as recorded on the ship's register was: M. Rowan, Worcester, Worcestershire, England. "On Tuesday, February 15, 1853, under direction of Joseph W. Young, who presided over the Preston Conference, a company of 345 Saints, namely 261 adults, seven cabin passengers, and four cooks, sailed from Liverpool, England on board the ship "Elvira Owen", the sixty-fourth company of Saints."  (Journal of the Elvira Owen)
 

The Millenial Star records: "Under the direction of Joseph W. Young, who had presided over the Preston Conference, a company of three hundred and forty-five Saints sailed from Liverpool on the fifteenth of February, 1853, on board the ship Elvira Owen...On the twenty-third of March, 1853, after a most speedy voyage lasting only thirty-six days, the Elvira Owen arrived at the bar at the mouth of the Mississippi River. Three births, three marriages and three deaths occurred during the voyage. There were a few cases of small-pox, which, however, did not prove fatal, and the disease did not spread to any great extent. Captain Owen treated the Saints with much kindness, especially the sick, and a memorial, expressive of their gratitude for his fatherly conduct to all, was presented to him by the passengers. After being detained at the bar several days the Elvira Owen was towed up the river, and the emigrants landed in New Orleans on the thirty-first of March. Proceeding up the Mississippi River the emigrants arrived in Keokuk on the thirteenth of April, being two days short of two months from Liverpool, which was considered an extraordinarily rapid journey."  (Millenial Star, Vol. XV, pp. 154, 288 and 361, on the Mormon Immigration Index CD)
 

"On March 23, 1853 after a speedy voyage, lasting only 36 days, the ship arrived at the bar at the mouth of the Mississippi. The trip across the vast span of water was far from being pleasant. The Green family, along with others, were frightened and seasick from the rocking of the ship and the violent waves dashing over the deck. Food and fresh water must be taken along. One pint of drinking water a day was allowed each person. All cooking was done in a small room on deck, then the food had to be carried down the ship ladder to the family members below."  (History of William Henry Green; Melissa Green Manwill)  The Green's youngest daughter, Hannah, remembered that "as they crossed the ocean the waves would rock the ship and how seasick some would get."  (The Family of William Henry Green; Joseph B. Robinson)
 
 

The ship arrived 13 April 1853. "Waiting to welcome the Saints at the bar was Brother John Brown, the Church agent in charge of all Saints on their way to Utah. After being detained for several days, the vessel was towed up the River, landing in New Orleans the 31st day of March. Proceeding up the river they arrived at Keokuk on April 13, being two days short of being two months since leaving Liverpool. This was considered an extraordinarily rapid journey." (History of William Henry Green; Melissa Green Manwill)
 
 

Keokuk, Iowa was the main outfitting point for the Saints. "While making necessary preparations for the long trek across the Plains, the Green family pitched their tents at Montrose, Iowa." (History of William Henry Green; Melissa Green Manwill)  Montrose was just across the river from the beautiful and nearly deserted city of Nauvoo.
 
 

The family prepared to make the 1500-mile journey to the Salt Lake Valley. The Green family travelled with the Cyrus H. Wheelock Company, and was in the James Picton Ten Pound Company. The company left Keokuk on 3 June 1853.
 

"The James Picton Ten Pound Company, Members of the Joseph Davis Hundred:
 

William Henry Green

Mary Bennett Green
John Green
Mary Green Jr.
Hannah Green

 

A study of the passenger list of the ship "Elvira Owen" and that of the Cyrus H. Wheelock Company indicates that the 345 Saints who left Liverpool, England, February 12, 1853, stayed together as a whole and made up the bulk of the 396 members of the Cyrus H. Wheelock Company.  The William Henry Green family was one of those who made the continuous journey, although the name of Samuel Green is not included in the Cyrus H. Wheelock Company passenger list. It is not known how Samuel Green reached the Great Salt Lake Valley. There is some evidence, however, that he did arrive with his family."  (History of the William Henry Green Family, 1970)
 

William was 44 years old, and Mary was 57 years old. A history of John Green talks about the challenges Mary faced: “They had to walk the whole distance as there weren’t enough wagons and oxen for them to ride. Their mother (Mary Bennett Green) was a very frail little lady and the trip was very hard on her. Her two sons, Samuel and John would put her on a cart and push her part of the way.” (Life of John Green)  The youngest daughter, Hannah, was only eleven years old, and remembered, "She told about the trip across the plains, how most of the people had to walk and how tired she would get being so small. She said many times she got under some of the bedding where she could not be seen, then she could ride. Food was very scarce, and there was sickness. It was a long weary road with many discouraging days for the company." (The Family of William Henry Green; Joseph B. Robinson)  They arrived in the Salt Lake Valley on 16 October 1853. After a short rest, they traveled south to Pleasant Grove in their covered wagon.
 
 

In Pleasant Grove, the fort had just been completed. The Green family lived in their covered wagon, until a one room house could be built inside the fort square. This was a large one-room log cabin. A map of early Pleasant Grove showed the William Green family in Lot 1 on South Street. Opposite them, in Lot 1 on North Street, is a lot labeled “Bennett”. It is not known if this was a relation of Mary’s.
 
 

1855 was a difficult year for the Saints in Pleasant Grove. Crickets destroyed the crops. Mary and her daughters gathered sego, thistle and red roots to feed the family. William moved his family to a two-story soft rock home he built. (It is still standing, at 309 South 100 East in Pleasant Grove, and stayed in the Green family until 1975.)  In a history of Hannah Green, she remembered that "after the family settled in Pleasant Grove, her older sister helped their mother in the house and the two older boys and she worked on the large farm with their father". (Quoted in the History of the William Henry Green Family, on file with the Daughters of Utah Pioneers)

Walking Tour of Pleasant Grove


William and Mary’s children married and set up homes of their own. Mary married Bishop Henson Walker in 1856. John married Sarah Alexander the same year. Samuel married Pamelo Wishaw in 1858. Hannah married George Meyrick in 1862.  The 1860 census shows John, Samuel and William all living next to each other.
 
 

 
1860 census, Pleasant Grove (Battle Creek), Utah


As the settlement of Pleasant Grove grew, William became the town herdsman. He was responsible for taking the cattle safely to and from pasture each morning and night. There were marauding Indians and would steal a calf or cow when they could.  In the History of William Henry Green it states "The Green family was industrious and became progressive farmers. They were extremely prompt and exact in every detail. An old friend of the family often told how as neighbors they could safely set their clock by William Henry Green taking his cows to the pasture."  Another history says: "William was a strong believer in the old saying, "Make hay while the sun shines", for in the spring he was up at 5 a.m. In the winter, six o'clock found him up working around his home." (History of William Henry Green; Melissa Green Manwill)
 
 

William must have been asked to care for additional plural wives. Records show a marriage to Mary Ann Simmons Harris 1 October 1864 in Salt Lake City, and  Ellen Edmondson Kendall in 1866 in Salt Lake City. Ellen appears on the 1870 census with William and Mary.
 
 

1870 census, Pleasant Grove, Utah

Ellen Kendall Green died in 1872. Mary Bennett Green died on 9 July 1974, aged 78, and was buried in the Pleasant Grove Cemetery. William married  Joanna Richards Hicks 9 November 1874 in Salt Lake City.
 
 

"William Henry was of a very jovial nature. He was of a medium build, with thin dark hair. He had a capacity for courageous faith. It is to the credit of the Green family that they met the test. He was a stalwart colonizer in the Pleasant Grove settlement. He helped the town grow toward a better life for its people. He had a span of mules, and one night he went into them without first talking to them. They became frightened and kicked him. He died from the effects of this accident."  History of William Henry Green; Melissa Green Manwill)  William Henry died December 5, 1878, at the age of seventy, and was buried in the Pleasant Grove Cemetery.
 
 

Headstone of William Green and his four wives
Pleasant Grove, Utah Cemetery
 
 
 

HISTORY OF
WILLIAM HENRY GREEN
Written and compiled by Melissa Green Manwill
Parleys Camp, South East Center

 


William Henry Green was born January 1, 1809 in Payne, Stafford, England. His father was John Green and mother was Sarah Meredith Green.
We know practically nothing of their life in England, as far as them leaving a history or biography is concerned. This history is written from memories of the youngest daughter, and a study of the conditions and life of the common man in England at that period that the Green family lived there. For to know the history of the people from whom he descended, and to have an understanding of the conditions existing at a particular period will help one to visualize an ancestor as a real person, and not merely as a name identified by a date, place, or relationship. So I have studied the history of the people of England, Wales, and it is a story of the struggles, sorrows, and defeats and victories of one's ancestors, whether or not they are known by name to historians. It is a story of hardship and sorrow. The horrors of war, with its victories and defeats, caused bitterness, heartaches, and a continued struggle for daily existence.

England in that period was an agricultural country, with trade centering in a few large towns. During the 18th century, a series of mechanical inventions led to the great advance in manufacturing. This period was called the Industrial Revolution. This, coupled with the rapid development of overseas markets caused a shift of the population. Between 1770 and 1831, Liverpool multiplied its population five times. Manchester rose from nine million to eighteen million. There was no legislation to control the vast industrial development, as there was great suffering on the part of the exploited working classes. Among those drinking of the bitter as well as the refreshing cup of experience was the family of William Henry Green.
 
 

In the fall of 1829 he married the girl of his choice, Mary Bennett. She was born a short distance away, in an inland town, bounded on the north by Chestershire, and a small portion of the Welsh county of Flint. Although several years his senior, Mary proved to be a very capable and efficient helpmate.
 
 

A small cottage of rough lumber, located in the market town of Claverly, in the All Saints parish, was the first abode shared by William and Mary. William, a "common laborer", earned his daily bread by the sweat of his brow. Four children were born to this union. They were: Samuel, born 28 Oct 1831 at Claverly; John, who is my grandfather, born 27 October 1834; Mary, born 19 February 1837; and Hannah, born 15 March 1841.
 

The Green family started shifting around to find employment, first in Gloucestershire and Staffordshire. At an early age Samuel and John shifted for themselves, seeking employment. later they joined their father, who had taken up residence in Kensworth, Hertfordshire. It was here that the family became interested in Mormonism. They joined the Bedford Conference, after being baptized January 11, 1850. They became devout members of the Studham Branch. After joining the Church, life changed for the Green family. They had accepted the new religion from the depths of their hearts and although ridiculed by many, they were willing to make all sacrifices necessary for the Gospel's sake. Their greatest desire was to gather with the Saints to Zion.
 

It was shortly after Christmas in the year 1852, when William Green and family bade farewell to their old friends and relatives, clicked the key in the door of the little greystone cottage which they called home for the last time. This home was located on McRowan St. in Worcester. Mary's heart rejoiced as she thought of a new home and friends they would join, and mingle with in the land of the Rockies; little did she dream of the sacrifices and hardships they would experience in the days to follow.
 
 

Arriving at Liverpool, William deposited 6,000 shillings to pay for their transportation to America. After making all arrangements, they were told that the sea was rough and dangerous and that no ships would sail before the middle of January. The only thing William could do was rent a small place and wait. Here Mary glimpsed signs of difficulties.
 
 

The Green family was assigned to sail on the Ellen Maria, but the Captain informed them that only Samuel would be able to go. Having no desire to sail alone, Samuel sold his ticket to another passenger and he remained to travel with his dear family. In the emigration records of Liverpool is found the following: Wm. Green, age 43, served in the British Army in Company E, Address McRowan St. Watford, Worcester; Mary, his wife, age 57; Samuel, son, age 21; John son, age 18; Mary, daughter, age 14; Hannah, daughter, age 11.
 
 

Sunday, January 23, after a prayerful and instructive meeting, William H. Green and family made ready again to set sail on the ship Golconda, but again disappointment was experienced when they were transferred to the ship Elvira Owen. This vessel docked in Liverpool Harbor February 2, 1853, and finally set sail for New Orleans, February 12.
 
 

Under direction of Joseph W. Young, who presided over the Preston Conference, a company of 345 Saints left Liverpool. Imagine the emotions they felt as they bid farewell to their native homeland, perhaps to never see it again, and sail out into a new country, but their faith was so great that the Lord would protect them that they never wavered.
 
 

On March 23, 1853 after a speedy voyage, lasting only 36 days, the ship arrived at the bar at the mouth of the Mississippi. The trip across the vast span of water was far from being pleasant. The Green family, along with others, were frightened and seasick from the rocking of the ship and the violent waves dashing over the deck. Food and fresh water must be taken along. One pint of drinking water a day was allowed each person. All cooking was done in a small room on deck, then the food had to be carried down the ship ladder to the family members below. There were daily prayers for guidance and safety. Mary, the daughter, often mingled her beautiful voice with the other Saints in singing the songs of Zion. Thus amid laughter and tears the long hours were spent at sea.
 
 

Waiting to welcome the Saints at the bar was Brother John Brown, the Church agent in charge of all Saints on their way to Utah. After being detained for several days, the vessel was towed up the River, landing in New Orleans the 31st day of March. Proceeding up the river they arrived at Keokuk on April 13, being two days short of being two months since leaving Liverpool. This was considered an extraordinarily rapid journey.
 
 

While journeying, Brother John Brown told the Green family about the beautiful Utah Valley, with its groves of cottonwood trees and sparkling streams of fresh water. "It would be an ideal spot to call home", said Elder Brown.
 
 

While making necessary preparations for the long trek across the Plains, the Green family pitched their tents at Montrose, Iowa. When everything was in readiness, they started the trek into the wilderness. The morning they left, the sun was shining full strength overhead. This was the morning of July 11, 1853. Some of the Company came under the provision of the Ten Pound Company, and some by the Perpetual Emigration Fund. The Greens came by the Ten Pound Company.
 
 

The Company had 17 horses, 2 mules, 216 oxen, 83 cows, 12 heifers, 52 wagons, and one carriage. They came in the Cyrus H. Wheelock Company. All the Saints were anxious and eager to reach their destination. They were overjoyed at being on their 1500 mile journey. Both adults and children walked almost the entire distance. Occasionally the younger ones were allowed to rode on the back of an oxen, after their feet had become blistered and sore. The hot sand burned their feet, and the cactus thorns often penetrated their feet. The way was long and hard. Patience and endurance coupled with faith and trust in their Heavenly Father marked well the trail, as they slowly plodded along. Summer heat faded into chilly autumn breezes.
 
 

It was a joyful day when they reached the mountains. and looked down into the Salt Lake Valley. Their arrival was October 16, 1853.
 
 

Captain Wheelock says, "I am happy to state that the Camp in general, both people and oxen are in a prosperous condition, considering the privations they have been compelled to submit to in crossing over many barren districts." They traveled in two companies, the first under Captain Pixton's Ten Pound, and Captain Whitworth's Independent Company.
 
 

After a short rest in Salt Lake, the family decided to go south into Pleasant Grove, Utah. President Brigham Young encouraged them to help settle the community. Traveling with their covered wagons, yoke of oxen, and their meager belonging, they entered Pleasant Grove hoping to find rest and peace of mind, and a permanent home.
 
 

The Fort had just been completed. So it was inside the Fort that the family found their home in the land of Zion. What a happy feeling it was to know that at last they had reached their destination. They lived in their covered wagon until a one-room house could be built inside the Fort Square. The children liked to get water from the unique water system which was piped from the mountain springs to the Fort. A covering made to keep the water clean was lifted up and water dipped out with a bucket, then the wooden covering was replaced. Anyone caught tampering with the water was fined.
 
 

The year 1855 proved a sad one for the Saints, who were so bravely struggling for existence. Mid-summer promised a bounteous harvest, but with the return of the crickets, coming in a cloud and eating every blade of green grass there was, discouragement ran high. By the time these pests were destroyed, the crops were also destroyed. During these trying times the mother and children went into the foothills to dig sego, thistle and red-root. After cooking them, they tasted delicious to the starving settlers. All shared from their scanty storehouse, one with another. With prayerful hearts they survived an extra hard winter.
 
 

The Green family was a large one-room log cabin built two blocks east of the center of present Pleasant Grove city. A short time later, William replaced this log cabin with a two-story soft rock home. Farmers by vocation, the Green family were progressive and industrious people, extremely prompt and exact in all their dealings with their fellow man. Due to the severe winters, all clothing must be made warm and durable, so knitting needles were seldom idle. By the dim candle light Mary knit, sewed, darned, tore carpet rags, and made quilt blocks. Old stockings and high-necked sweaters were unraveled and reknit into warm mittens, stockings, and gloves.
 
 

In the late summer, after the grain had been harvested, Mary and the children gleaned for the heads that had been missed. These kernels of wheat were threshed out by tromping on the sacks. They continued using the old coffee mill to grind the wheat into flour. William was a strong believer in the old saying, "Make hay while the sun shines", for in the spring he was up at 5 a.m. In the winter, six o'clock found him up working around his home.
 
 

As the settlement of Pleasant Grove grew, William became the town herdsman. He was responsible for taking the cattle safely to and from pasture each morning and night. There were marauding Indians and would steal a calf or cow when they could.
 
 

William Henry died December 5, 1878, at the age of seventy. He was buried in Pleasant Grove. The Deseret News didn't carry an account of his death, as it was also the death date of Apostle Orson Hyde. The paper gave three full columns about his funeral and his sermons, so there wasn't any room for any other death notices.
 

William Henry was of a very jovial nature. He was of a medium build, with thin dark hair. He had a capacity for courageous faith. It is to the credit of the Green family that they met the test. He was a stalwart colonizer in the Pleasant Grove settlement. He helped the town grow toward a better life for its people. He had a span of mules, and one night he went into them without first talking to them. They became frightened and kicked him. He died from the effects of this accident.
 
 

This history was written and compiled by a great-granddaughter: Melissa Green Manwill, 2279 Oneida St., Salt Lake City, Utah; Parleys Camp, South East Center; April 22, 1971. It is on file at the Daughters of Utah Pioneers Library, Salt Lake City.
 
 
 
 


FAMILY GROUP RECORD OF

WILLIAM HENRY GREEN
AND MARY BENNETT


William Henry Green


WILLIAM HENRY GREEN was born 1 January 1809 in Wolverhampton, Stafford, England, to John Green and Sarah Meredith. He was christened 5 February 1809 in Penn, Stafford, England. William Henry married (1) MARY BENNETT (THOMASON) 20 July 1830 in Kingswinford, Staffordshire, (2) Mary Ann Simmons Harris 1 October 1864 in Salt Lake City, (3) Ellen Edmondson Kendall in 1866 in Salt Lake City, and (4) Joanna Richards Hicks 9 November 1874 in Salt Lake City. Mary Bennett was christened 22 August 1796 in St. Phillips, Birmingham, Warwickshire to William and Elizabeth Bennett. She was raised in the area around Bridgnorth, Shropshire. She married (1) Samuel Thomason 12 April 1819 in Kidderminster, Worcestershire, then (2) William Henry Green. William and Mary were married just after William's mother died, and only a few short weeks before his father died. He was the only surviving child of his father. William and Mary emigrated to Utah in 1853. William Henry died 5 December 1878 in Pleasant Grove, Utah, Utah and was buried there. Mary died 9 July 1874 in Pleasant Grove and was buried there. William Henry and Mary had the following children:
 
 

*1. Samuel, born 28 October 1831 in Claverley, Shropshire, England; married Pamelo Wishaw 28 August 1858 in Salt Lake City; died 18 January 1910 in Pleasant Grove.
 

2. John, 23 November 1834 in Claverley; married Sarah Malinda Alexander 27 May 1856; died 16 November 1908 in Mona, Juab, Utah.
 

3. Mary, 19 February 1838 in Claverley; married Henson Walker 3 July 1856 in Salt Lake City; died 4 January 1906 in Pleasant Grove.
 

4. Hannah, born 15 March 1841 in Claverley; married George William Meyrick about 1862; died 13 June 1919 in Salina, Sevier, Utah.
 

Prior to her marriage to William Henry Green, Mary was married to Samuel Thomason, and had a daughter:

1. Sarah, christened 26 May 1822 in Bobbington, Staffordshire; married Thomas Crowther 7 May 1849 in Dudley, Worcestershire; died 6 March 1855 near St. Louis, Missouri.
 
 

SOURCES: History of the William Henry Green Family; Henson Walker Family History; IGI; "History of William Henry Green" by Melissa Green Manwill; The Family of William Henry Green; Joseph B. Robinson; Ancestral File, Family History Library; St. Phillips parish register, Birmingham; Quatt parish register, FHL# 501467; Kingswinford parish register, FHL# 435779; Kidderminster parish register, FHL# 435266; National Burial Index; 1841 English census.
 
 


 

If you have additional information about this family, please contact me at alice@boydhouse.com.
 
 

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