There are no christening records for Elizabeth Rigley in about 1640, in or around Smalley, Derbyshire, where she married Henry Godkin. Several public trees suggest that Elizabeth Rigley was the daughter of John Wiggley of Wirksworth. There is a christening record for Elizabeth Wiggley in 1640 in Wirksworth.


 
FAMILY GROUP RECORD OF
JOHN WIGGLEY AND
BRIGETT GELL


John Wiggley was christened 4 June 1617 in Wirksworth, Derbyshire, the son of Richard Wiglye and Elizabeth Hall.


John
        Wigley baptism

Baptism record for John Wigley in Wirksworth: "John fillius Mr. Richarde Wiglye baptized - 4 of June"


John was an alumni of Cambridge University, entering in 1634.


John married Brigett Gell January 1637 in Carsington, Derbyshire. Brigett was the daughter of John Gell. "Bridgett married John Wigley of Wigwell Grange. These three Derbyshire sons-in-law were to be critical in supporting Gell through the next decade and their families would maintain the Puritan cause long after 1662. The Wigleys were perhaps the most important allies. An old lead mining family from Wirksworth, they had acquired land in Leicestershire and Nottinghamshire by shrewd marriages. The John Wigley who married Bridgett Gell was the son of Richard Wigley, who had inherited Wigwell Grange from his brother Henry. Two of Richard Wigley’s daughters married into Puritan families. Faith Wigley married Thomas Shelmerdine, Vicar of Crich, and was therefore the mother of Daniel Shelmerdine, who led the 1689 Nonconformists to Bakewell. Anne Wigley married Henry Buxton of Bradbourne, who would play a role in the Presbyterian Classis at Wirksworth during the Commonwealth. Moreover, the Wigleys were already related to the Gells through the second marriage of John Gell’s grandfather, Ralph Gell, to Emma Beresford. One of their daughters was married to Henry Wigley, Richard’s older brother. The Wigley family were friends of Martin Topham, Puritan rector of Wirksworth. These are the classic models of country squires and their families who would support Parliament in the Civil War." (Nonconformity in Derbyshire: A Study in Dissent, 1600-1800, Stephen Orchard)


John died and was buried 5 December 1647 in Wirksworth.


John
        Wiggley burial

Burial record for John Wiggley in Wirksworth: "John Wiggley sepulta - 5 of September"



John and Brigett had the following children:


1. John, christened 3 June 1639 in Wirksworth; likely died young.


*2. Elizabeth, christened 23 September 1640 in Wirksworth; married Henry Godkin 2 February 1666 in Smalley; buried 6 September 1687 in Smalley.

Elizabeth Wigley
      baptism

Baptism record for Elizabeth Wigley in Wirksworth: "Elizabeth filia John Wiggley Esq bapt - 23 of September"



3. John, christened 8 November 1642 in Wirksworth.


4. Ann, christened 6 August 1643 in Wirksworth.


5. Henry, christened 8 September 1644 in Wirksworth; his monument in the church in Wirksworth reads: "Sacred to the memory of HENRY WIGLEY of Wigwall in this parish Esquire son of JOHN, son of RICHARD, who was second son and heir of HENRY WIGLEY of Middleton in this parish, gentleman, who lies interred under the table monument, lineally descended from JOHN de WIGLEY."


6. Thomas, christened 7 February 1646 in Wirksworth.


7. Margreat, christened 25 August 1647 in Wirksworth.


8. Anne, christened 1 August 1648 in Wirksworth.



SOURCES: Wirksworth parish register; Nonconformity in Derbyshire: A Study in Dissent, 1600-1800, by Stephen Orchard; www.ancestry.com.



Wirksworth

Wirksworth



FAMILY GROUP RECORD OF
RICHARD WIGLEY AND
ELIZABETH HALL


Richard Wigley was born in about 1583 of Wirksworth, the son of Henry Wigley and Elizabeth Gell.  He married Elizabeth Hall, the daughter of Henry Hall,  14 April 1605 in Costock, Nottinghamshire.


In an article on Wigley Grange by Derek A. Wigley, Richard's life is described: "In 1598 Henry’s second son Richard obtained a lease of some lands at Costock in Nottinghamshire. It was there that he met his wife to be, Elizabeth Hall, and her sister Jane, who would eventually marry Edward Lowe of Alderwasley. In 1603 Wigwell was settled on Richard and two years later (March 3rd 1605) the marriage settlement between Henry Hall, Henry Wigley and Richard was drawn up. By this indenture Henry Hall was to pay Henry Wigley £200 – and certain lands were to be settled on Elizabeth Hall for her life. These were “Wigwall Green and Rough Close, Ould Wigwalls and Haseleys all being near the capital messuage, and the Water Mill with the Griste Soake and Cley Flatts”. Richard now built a house adjoining the old grange, which was rather different from the usual farmhouses of the area. By 1610 Richard and Elizabeth had three daughters and in that year his father died, and Wigwell gained a half of Henry’s library. It was not until 1617 that his first son, John was born, to be followed in 1618 by Edward who died an infant, and in 1620 by Richard. When Richard died in 1635 John, his heir, was yet an infant at law (under 21) so his mother placed the estate in the Court of Wards." (Derbyshire Miscellany, Vol 3)


An article on the Wigleys describes Richard and his marriage: "Richard could be considered as the adventurer of the family...During the few years that Richard spent near Nottingham he absorbed something of the way of life of the town dweller and their methods of entertaining. He was on very good terms with the neighboring families and in two of them found his own wife-to-be and a husband for his sister Mary...Richard's marriage could well have been a love match. Elizabeth Hall of Costock was very capable and she applied her talents very well in later life when she was widowed and her eldest son was still in his minority." (Old Henry Wigley, by Derek Wigley, Derbyshire Miscellany, Vol 4)


Richard died and was buried  in Wirksworth 27 April 1635 in Wirksworth.


Richard Wigley burial

Burial record for Richard Wigley in Wirksworth: "Richard Wigley gen sepult - 27 of Aprill"



Richard left a will written 1 April 1635 and proven September 1635.


Richard Wigley will

Will of Richard Wigley of Wigwell, 1635


In the name of God Amen: the ffirst day of Aprilll in the yeare of our Lord God one thousand sixe hundred thirty and ffive, and in the eleaventh yeare of the raigne of our soveraigne Lord Charles by the grace of God of England, Scotland, ffrance and Irelande kinge defender of the faith, I Richard Wigley of Wigwell in the County of Derby gent doe constitute ordayne and make this my last will and testament in manner and forme followinge that is to say, ffirst I commit my soule into the hands of my heavenly ffather and appoint that my bodie be buried at Wirkesworth amongst my ancestors hopeinge for a comfortable resurrection only through the sacrifice satisfaccon and merittes of my Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ. Item my will is and I give devise and appoint that all my woode underwoode and trees in the Hastleys be feld, and sould by my executrix within the space of two yeares next after my decease to and for the use and benifitt of my daughter Elizabeth Wigley to be payd unto her for soone as it shall be collected and gathered. Item I give and bequeath unto my daughter Ffaith Shelmerdine two messuages ffarmes of tenements lyinge and beinge in Matlocke in the County of Derby with all the lande tenements and hereditaments thereunto belonging nowe in the tenure of occupacon of William Cockayne Taylor oand Edward Bankes husbandman both of Matlocke aforesaid for and duringe the terme of the natural life of the said Ffaith Shelmerdine. Item I give and bequeath unto my sonne Edward Wigley for and duringe the terme of his natural life two ffarmes, messuages or tenements scituate and beinge in Matlocke aforesaid with all the lands tenements and heredimenence thereunto belonging nowe in the tenure or occupacon of John Bradwell and George Ogden theire assigne or assinges. Item I give and bequeath to my grandchilde Samuell Shelmerdine one hundred poundes of good and lawfull money of England to remayne in the hands of my loving brother in law Robert Hall gent and my sonne in law Henry Buxton for the use and behoofe of the said Samuell until hee come to the age of one and twenty yeares and then to be payd to the said Samuell Shelmerdine with sixe pound p annum of money duringe all the while it remains in the hands of the said Robert and Henry. But if it please God to call the said Sammuel Shelmerdine before hee attayne the age of one and twenty yeares then the said money with the increase according to the rate of sixe poundes p annum for the tyme then past and after till the money be payd to be payd unto my daughter Ffaith Shelmerdine within the space of one yeare next followinge the decease of the said Samuell Shelmerdine. Item I give and bequeath unto my sonne Henry Buxton one messuage or tenement commonly call Spencers in the Lane lyinge and beinge in Midleton in the County of Derby with all lands commons pffitte and hereditaments to the said ffarme belonging now in the tenure or occupacon of one Henry Spencer of Midleton aforesaid for and during the terme of one and twenty yeares next after my decease. Item I give unto my sonne John Wigley all my bookes. Item I constitute ordayne and appoint my beloved wife my sole executrixs of this my last will and testament and my brother in law Robert Hall and my loving cosen Thomas Fflynt gent my supvisors. In witness whereof I the sayd Richard Wigley have hereunto sett my hand and seale the day and yeare so above written. Richard Wigley. / Sealed and delivered in the presence of signed Jane Lowe, Peter Watkinson Robert Hall Henry Wooddis, Edward Allen./


Elizabeth died and was buried 26 October 1637 in Wirksworth.


Elizabeth Wigley burial

Burial record for Elizabeth Wigley in Wirksworth: "Elizabeth Wigley widow sepult 26 of October"



Rycharde and Elizabeth had the following children:


1. Elizabeth, born about 1606 of Wirksworth; married Martin Topham.


2. Ann, born in about 1607 of Wirksworth; married Henry Buxton 29 December 1634 in Wirksworth; mentioned in father's will of 1635.


3. Faith, born about 1610 of Wirksworth: married Thomas Shelmerdine 17 February 1633 in Crich, Derbyshire; mentioned in father's will of 1635.


4. Jane, christened 3 December 1614 in Wirksworth; buried 17 October 1624 in Wirksworth.


*5. John, christened 4 June 1617 in Wirksworth; mentioned in father's will of 1635; married Brigett Gell 3 August 1638 in Wirksworth.


6. Edward, christened 21 December 1618 in Wirksworth; mentioned in father's will of 1635.


7. Richard, christened August 1620 in Wirksworth; buried 5 June 1632 in Wirksworth.




SOURCES: Wirksworth parish register; will of Richard Wigley of Wigwell, 1635; Derbyshire Miscellany, Vol. 3; www.ancestry.com.



FAMILY GROUP RECORD OF
HENRY WIGLEY AND
ELIZABETH GELL



Henry Wigley was born in about 1543, the son of John Wigley and Elizabeth Crane. He married Elizabeth Gell, the daughter of Ralph Gell and Emma Beresford.

"Elizabeth Gell married Henry at Carsington when she was about 15 years old, (probably about 1566). The customs of the times indicate that Henry would have courted her for about six months and that she was agreeable to
the match. After the wedding the bride and groom lived at Ralph Gell's house for their "honey-month" and at the end of that time the dowry was paid and they went to live in Henry's house which was probably in Senior Field." (Old Henry Wigley, by Derek Wigley, Derbyshire Miscellany, Vol. 4)


Wigley
        Pedigree

The Reliquary: Depository for Precious Relics, Legendary, Biographical, and Historical, Volume 12


"In 1570 Ellzabeth gave Henry his first son, who was called Thomas. This would cause a major celebration, to be followed a year later by a second son Richard. In all there were eight sons and three daughters. Henry and Elizabeth were very happy. Many of their children were naned after their godparents. Their eldest son's godfather was Thonas GeII (Sir John's father) the second son's godfather was brother Richard, Mary's godmother was Mary Hurt, Elizabeth's sister. Anthony was godson to Anthony Gell. John was godson to John WigIey of the Gatehouse, Henry's brother Ralph was godfather to the fifth son. The other godparents are more difficult to find, but by the time the sixth child was born, in 1579, John, Henry's father died. Elizabeth his widow went to live in a cottage in Senior Field, and Henry and Elizabeth and their children went to 1ive in "The Hall' at Mliddleton." (Old Henry Wigley, by Derek Wigley)


Although from a farming family, Henry made a fortune in lead mining, and was granted a coat of arms. In 1586, Henry purchased land in Wirksworth: “On March 1st 1586 Wigwall was purchased by Henry Wigley of Middleton by Wirksworth from George Babington of Kingston for £300. Although Henry Wigley had purchased Wigwell he never lived in the Grange. His interest in the estate was mainly for the timber which he used on his “bole”; lead-smelting was one of his family’s more important activities.” (Derbyshire Miscellany, Vol. 3)


"Henry seems to have had no small ability in these matters - and was careful for his family's health. In his garden there were roses and some of the hardier English flowers but there were many herbs, and his wife Elizabeth was well skilled in making herbal brews which were considered efficacious - for in his commonplace book, headed "The Vertues of Nyne Waters", Henry wrote the following:-

Water of Churne1l is good for a sore mouth,
Water of Calaminte is good for the stomake,
Water of Plantin is good for the flixe and whott dropsie,
Water of Fennell is good to make a gt bodye small, and for the eye.
Water of Vyolette is good for a man that is swollen in the bodye or for the raynes & the liver.
Water of Endyve is good for jaundice, dropsie & the stomake.
Water of Burradge is good for the stomake & the collique.
Water of both sages is good for palsy.
Water of Betanye is good for heavinges and all manner of Sickness in man's boddye.

Besides these Henry grew "Hyssope, Thyme, Winter Sage, Sweet Marjoram and. Rosemary", and he had a small orchard." (Old Henry Wigley)


Henry died and was buried 18 June 1610 in Wirksworth, at which time his widow Elizabeth moved into the Senior Field, where there were several cottages.


Henry left a will written 16 May 1610 and proven 30 October 1610:


Henry Wigley will

Will of Henry Wigley, 1610


In the name of God Amen the sixteenth day of May in the yeare of our Lord God one thousand sixe and tenne I Henry Wigley of Middleton in the County of Derby gentleman, beeinge of very good and pfect memory thankes be to God, do make and declare this my last will and testament as followeth first I comend my soule into the hands of Almighty God, trusting faithfully of the salvation therof by the mercies & merittes of Jesus Christ, my onely Saviour and redeemer, and my body to be buried in the parish church of Werkesworth at the discretion of my executours hereafter named: And also I do hereby niholate, make ffanstrate and void all former will or willes heretofore by me made or done whatsoever. Item I will and devise the summe of ffyve poundes to be distributed to and amongst the poore of the said parish church of Werkesworth by my executors upon the day of my buriall. Item Item I will and devise to a learned preacher that shall preach at the church of Werkesworth aforesaid upon the day of my burial, the summe of tenne shillinges Item my will is, that my executours shall out of my gooddes be at the charge of a tombe to bee set over the place where my body shall lye. Item I give and bequeath unto my godsonne Henry Wigley my brother Raph his sonne one cowe & one calfe and tenne ewe lambes to be put forth to his best profit and use.Item I give and bequeath unto every of the children of  of Eme Barlow my daughter  James Barlow, Thomas Barlow and Elizabeth Barlow the summe of tenne poundes a peece, to be set forth within one yeare after my decease for their best use and comoditie by the advise of my executours and supervisours till every one of them shall accomplish their age of one and twenty yeares, and said summe before devised with the increase theof or issuing to be paid unto them and every of them, and if it happens that any of the said children of the said Eme Barlowe, to dy or dept this life before they shall accomplish their said several ages of one & twenty yeares as aforesaid, then such legacy or legacyes shall be  and remaine to the survivor or survivors of them, and of every of them. Item I give and bequeath to my daughter Emme Barlow, twenty nobles. Item I give and bequeath to my eldest sonne Thomas Wigley one hundredth poundes to be paid unto him within one yeare after my deceasse. Item my will is that my said sonne Thomas shall conferme the leases made by me to Henry Gee, William Winffeld, John Milward, and Thomas Ffowale according to the tierme and meaninge of the said leases. Item I give and bequeathe unto Anthony Wigley my sonne the summe of twenty markes, to bee paid unto him within one half yeare after my deceasse. Item I bequeath to my brother Raphe Wigley ffourty shillinges. Item I give and bequeath unto my brother in lawe William Walker fforty shillinges. Item I give and bequeath unto Thomas Wigley my servant and sonne of Henry Wigley of Wharston yet deceased fforty shillinges. Item I give and bequeath unto my sonnes Thomas and Richard Wigley, all  my library and bookes whatsoever. Item I give and bequeath unto Henry Walker my godsone, second sonne of my brother in lawe William Walker, one cowe and a calf, and five ewe lambes, to be putt forth for his use. Item I and bequeath unto Edmund Spencer of Matlocke parish twenty shillinges to bee paid unto him within one yeare next after my deceasse. Item I give and bequeath unto Mary Olyver my sister Margret daughter fforty shillinges. Item I give and bequeat unto Raph Wigley my sonne twenty nobles. Item I give and bequeath to Dorathy Fflynt [torn] daughter twenty poundes. Item I give and bequeath unto my sonne Thomas my gylt bowle, and sixe silver spones that were William Barlowes, and the furniture and bedding that are now remanyinge & comonly used in the [torn] and which I lately bought of John Zouch Esquier. Item I give and bequeath to every of my servanntes that shall serve in my house at the tyme of my death five shillinges a peece. Item I give devise and bequeath to my sonne Thomas  [torn] ploughes and iron bound waynes plough tymber and all other implementes to the plough and wayne belonging whatsoever they bee. Item I give devise and bequeath unto my daughter Eme Barlowe one annuity or yearly rent of ffyve markes [torn] paid unto her yearly duringe her natural life, out of all those lands and tenements lyinge in Wirkesworth and which I heretofore purchased of Henry Wigley and George Wigley, the first payment to beginner at the next ffeast of St. Michaell tharchangell [torn] of our Lady which of them shall ffirst happen after my decease and so to continew payable half yearly at the foresaid ffeaste by equall portions. Item I will devise and bequeath all those lands tenements and herediments situate lyinge and being in {torn{ which I with my sonne Raph Wigley joined with me, bought of the aforesaid Henry Wigley and George Wigley of Scraptoft in the County of Lecester gentlemen and which were the lands and tenements of John Wigley of Werkesworth gentleman [torn] to and for the use and behooffe of my sonne Thomas Wigley and his assignes for and dureinge the tearme of his natural liffe, and from and after the deceasse of the said Thomas, then to the use and behooffe of the heires males of the same Thomas lawfully begotten, or to be begotten, and for default of such issue, then to and for the use and behooffe of Richard Wigley, one other of the sonnes of me the said Henry Wigley for and duringe the tearme of his natural liffe, and from & after the deceasse of the same Richard, then to the use and behooffe of the heires males of the same Richard lawfully begotten, or to bee begotten and for want of such issue then to the use and behooffe of the right heires of me the said Henry Wigley for ever. Item I give and bequeath unto Raph Wigley my sonne on annuity or yearly rent of sixe poundes thirteen shillinges and foure pence for the tearme of his natural liffe to be paid forth of the issues and pfitts of my house and lands called Senior ffylde situate lying and beinge in Matlock neer unto Cromfforth bridge and to be paid by my said sonne Thomas and his heires at two days or feastes in the yeare that is to say at the next feast day of St. Michaell tharchangell, or the Annunciation of our Lady which of them shall first happen after my deceasse, and so to continew payable halffe yearly, at the aforesaid ffeastes by equall portions. Item I give devise and bequeath unto Edmund Wigley my sonne one annuitye or yearly payment of nyne poundes to be issuing and paid unto him yearly duringe his natural liffe out of my parsonage of Shinye in the County of Stafford of two days or ffeastes in the yeare by equall portions by my said sonne Thomas and his heires the ffirst payment to beginner at the next feast day of St. Michaell tharchangell or the annunciation of our Lady which of them shall first happen after my deceasse and so to continue payable half yearly at the aforesaid feaste by equall porcons. Item I will devise and bequeath to the three children of my said sonne Raph Wigley twenty markes, equally to be devided amongst them and to be paid by myne executors within one yeare next after my deceasse unto the hands of Ffrancys Teylyor of Ballydon to be set forth by him to their use. Item I give an& bequeath unto Elizabeth my lovinge wiffe one bedstead with all the furniture and bedding therto belonging in the parler where she usually lyeth. Item I give devise & bequeath unto Mary Sterley my daughter my bay mere which I usually ride of. Item my will is that my executors shall within one yeare after my decease put put forth and inploy one hundreth markes for & duringe the natural liffe of Chrystoffer Sterley my sonne in lawe to the use and behooffe of my said daughter Mary and within one half yeare next after the deceasse of the said Chrystoffer, that my said executors shall pay unto my said daughter Mary the said hundreth markes fforty of my gooddes with the increase and profittes therof if my said daughter Mary shall be then be living. Item I will devise and bequeath unto my said sonne Richard Wigley one hundreth poundes to be paid him within one yeare after my deceasse. Item I will devise and bequeath unto my said sonne Thomas Wigley, and unto my said daughter Mary Sterley, my lease of certen lands in Lytchurch & Osmerston neer Darbie and all my tearme and tytle therin for and duringe all such tearme of yeares as I have yet to come therin equallie to be devided between them. And all the residue of my gooddes and chattelles not bequeathed, my legacies and funeral charges beinge pformed I give & bequeath unto my said sonne Thomas Wigley. And I ordeyne and make the same Thomas my said sonne Richard Wigley and my said brother in lawe William Walker executors of this my last will & testament. And I do name and appoint William Winfeild of Shefeld and Raph Wigley of Werkesworth my brother to bee supivsors on this my last will and testament and I give and bequeath to ether of them twenty shillings for their paines to bee taken in that behalf. Item my will is that if any pson or psons  who is or are to have any thinge by this my last will do go about by sute or other wise to interrupt the trew pformance of this my last will that then such pson or psons so goinge about to interrupt the trew pformance of this my last will (as aforesaid) to be excluded from recovering of any benefyttes by this my last will as if he or shee had never bene named or mentioned herin, and that his or her porton to him or her bequeathed shall go to maynteyne the sutes of lawe aagainst him or her, that shall so go about to interrupt ye trew pformance of this my last will at the discretion of my executors and supervisors. Also I give and bequeath forty shillinges towardes the repayringe of hye ways, that is to the inhabitants of Werkesworth towards the cawsyinge and pavinge of the lane leading from the North towne end of Werkesworth towards Cromfforth thirty shillinges and the other ten shillinges to be bestowed by my said sonne Thomas about the reparynge of the high waies at Steeple gate ^ at the breath gate. Item I give and bequeath to my sister Margrett Ollyver ffyve markes. In witnesse whearof I have herunto sett my hand & seale the day and yeare above written./
These being witnesses Edwarde Mellor of Wirkesworth, George Walker of Rybor, Henry Gee of Middleton, John Bradshaw of Wirkesworth.


Elizabeth died in 1626.

"Old Henry died in June 1610 and Thonas was named as one of his executors. Elizabeth, Henry's widow (a cousin of John Gell) went to live at Senior Field where she died .in 1626, at which time her grand-daughter Millicent  Wooddis was living with her." (Derbyshire Miscellany, Vol. 4; Faith Wigley's Will)


Henry and Elizabeth were buried in the Wirksworth parish church. Their monumental inscriptions was mentioned in a volume of Derbyshire church notes, written by Francis Bassano in 1710: "Upon Old Henry Wigley of Middleton his Monum't erected on ye north side ye chancell: who was grandfather to Henry above written. The ffigure at length of old Henry & his wife in antique dress, with their hands elivated as in prayer. Between their heads ye arms of Wigley vizt. At ye feet of Henry his 8 sons are yet to be seen. But his daughters at his wives feet are defaced by age. In a border round ye edge of ye covering stone of ye tombe of alibaster. "Here lyeth Henry Wigley of Middleton gentleman. He dyed ye 18 day of June Anno: 1610. And Eliz his wife daughter of Raph Gell of Hopton gentleman". On a border round ye face of stone:

I know yt my Redeemer liveth And yt
I shall rise out of ye Earth in ye last day
And shall be connected again into my skinne
And shall see God in my flesh
Yet I my selfe shall behold him."

(Old Henry Wigley, by Derek Wigley in Derbyshire Miscellany, Vol. 4)


Henry and Elizabeth had the following children:


1. Thomas, married Faith Durant, left a will dated 1635.


*2. Richard, married Bridgett Gell; died 24 April 1635 in Wirksworth.


3. Eme, married Mr. Barlow


4. Anthony, married Elizabeth; occupation: farmer; died June 1629.


5. Mary, married 1) Christopher Strelley; married 2) Henry Chaworth.


6. John


7. Raph, occupation - tanner; married Isabell.


8. Edmund


9. Edward


10. Henry


11. Dorothy, married 1) Henry Wooddiss, 2) Thomas Flint
 

SOURCES: Wirksworth parish register; will of Richard Wigley of Wigwell, 1635; Derbyshire Miscellany, Vol. 3; www.ancestry.com; The Reliquary: Depository for Precious Relics, Legendary, Biographical, and Historical, Volume 12; Old Henry Wigley, by Derek Wigley in Derbyshire Miscellany, Vol. 4; Cromford Village in Derbyshire.



Wirksworth

Wirksworth



FAMILY GROUP RECORD OF
JOHN WIGLEY AND
ELIZABETH CRANE


John Wigley was born in about 1490. He married Elizabeth Crane, daughter of Ralph Crane. "John Wigley, of Middleton, in the county of Derby, living in 1491, son of John Wigley of Worksworth, in the same shire, married Elizabeth, daughter of Ralph Crane". (Burke's Commoners of Great Britain). Other sources suggest that John's father was Richard Wigley.


"ln 1532 Richard purchased a fourth part of Roger More's lands in Middleton-by-Wirksworth for £8. At that time ]ohn Wigley was unmarried, and More, a draper of Derby, and presumably a business acquaintance, agreed to an abatement of half the purchase money if John would marry one of his daughters. The proposal was not favourably received because John, shortly afterwards married Elizabeth, daughter of Ralph Crane, a cousin of the Ge1l family. About 1533 their first son, Henry, was born." (Old Henry Wigley)


Wigley
        Pedigree

From Beresford Pedigree, Miscellanea
Genealogica et Heraldica, Vol. 1


The pedigree of the Wigleys is found in the Visitation of Derbyshire in 1611.


Wigley Pedigree

Visitation of Derbyshire, 1611


John died in 1579 in Wirksworth.



John and Elizabeth had the following children:


*1. Henry, married Elizabeth Gell


2. Raph, married Isabel.


3. Margrett, married Mr. Ollyver.


4. Richard, married Grace.


5. John, occupation: yeoman farmer; died 1591; "Early in January 1591 Henry's youngest brother John died. He did a good deal of the family weaving and in his cottage at Senior Field were three looms." (Old Henry Wigley)


6. Mary


7. Matthilda


SOURCES: Miscellanea genealogica et heraldica, Volume 1; A Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Commoners of Great Britain, Vol. 2; Visitation of Derbyshire, 1611; Cromford Village in Derbyshire.





FAMILY GROUP RECORD OF
RICHARD AND ISABEL WIGLEY



Richard Wigley was born in about 1470 of Wirksworth. He married Isabel.

"Richard Wigley was a yeoman, probably born in the 1480s. As a farmer he grew wheat, barley and oats, and in pasture there were sheep and goats. His wife and daughter wove the wool into cloth which was in great demand at that time. This alone could have founded his family's fortunes, but he also had a bole for smelting lead. Consequently he had amounts of ready money which he reinvested partially in 1and, for the bole required a great deal of firewood, and it was better to grow timber on one's own land than to buy it. By 1530 Richard had lent £30 to William Tagg, yeoman of Mat1ock, but since William could not repay this he sold two messuages, a cottage and thirty acres of land to Richard. This land was tenanted by Roger Walker. In 1532 (September) William Tagg, perhaps in need of ready money again, contracted a sale to John, Richard Wigley's elder son, for the remainder of his houses, lands, tenements, pastures and services. In the conveyance Richard Wigley's brother Willian (whose descendants lived at Mylnehouses) was a witness. A close on this land was called Senior Field...When Henry's grandfather Richard died in 1540  widowed lsabel went to live at Senior Field, and John and. Elizabeth and their children moved to Middleton.." (Old Henry Wigley, by Derek Wigley)


Wigley
        Pedigree

Wigley Pedigree from "Old Henry Wigley, by Derek Wigley,
Derbyshire Miscellany, Vol 4"


"In 1540 Richard Wigley died. He had lived at Middleton since buying land there from Roger More. The house was to become known as the Hall. In his will he requested to be buried in Wirksworth church before the St Catherine Quire, a chantry which had been founded by the Wigley family. He left money for prayers and masses to be said for him. Also "I bequeath to ye chapel of Crumford 11s." (two shillings) Richard also left to his wife Isabel, during her life "a close called Senyor Fyld with all the houses longing thereto with all ye rights and heyreditaments." (Cromford Village in Derbyshire)


Richard died in 1540, leaving a will written 9 August 1540 and proven 15 December 1540. He left bequests to his wife Isabell, son John, and daughters Elizabeth, Katheryne, and Crystyn.


Richard Wigley will

Will of Richard Wigley of Middleton, 1540



Isabel died September 1558, leaving a will dated 14 May 1556 and proven 16 September 1558: "In 1556 Grandmother Isabel - made her Will and made small bequests to Henry and his brothers - also a sheep to his cousin William of Millerrs Green, and Henry's Aunt Elizabeth was appointed. sole executrix" (Old Henry Wigley)  Isabel left bequests to her granddaughter Elizabeth Hall, her daughter Elizabeth, and son John.


"Isabel Wigley, Richard's widow, had moved to Senior Field in Cromford where she died in September 1558. She wanted to be buried in "my parish church of Matlok before ye image of oure lady (if my son John will be so pleased)." She did not choose to be buried with her husband, who eighteen years previously had been buried before the chantry of St Catherine in Wirksworth church. Included in the inventory of her goods were 4 "fodders" of lead, a measure worth at that time £5. These would be used as security against cash or goods. Two of them she left to her granddaughter Elizabeth Gell. The witnesses to the will were William Flint, priest, who wrote the will, John Lane, Thomas Woodwyse and Roger Walker - who still tenanted part of the lands. Among the appraisers of her estate were William Woodwyse, Edward Hygton and Henry Rag. Senior Field Close was left to Isabel for her lifetime so now reverted to her son John, who lived at The Hall, Middleton with his wife Elizabeth."  (Cromford Village in Derbyshire)


Isabell Wigley will

Will of Isabell Wigley, 1558



Richard and Isabell had the following children:


*1. John, married Elizabeth Crane.


2. Elizabeth


3. Katheryne


4. Crystyn



SOURCES:
Old Henry Wigley, by Derek Wigley in Derbyshire Miscellany, Vol. 4; will of Richard Wyggeley of Middleton, 1540; Cromford Village in Derbyshire.




Lead miner

A stone carving of a medieval lead miner in the church at Wirksworth,
carrying a pick and his wisket - a box for carrying ore.



FAMILY GROUP RECORD OF
RALPH AND ISABEL WIGLEY



Ralph Wigley was born in about 1435 of Wirksworth, the son of John Wigley. He married Isabel.


Ralph and Isabel had the following child:


*1. Richard, married Isabel.


2. William


SOURCES: Old Henry Wigley, by Derek Wigley in Derbyshire Miscellany, Vol. 4.




FAMILY GROUP RECORD OF
JOHN WIGLEY


John Wigley was born in about 1400 of Wirksworth. John was mentioned in a manor court record in 1451 at Wirksworth, when a cottage in Wirksworth was surrendered to the use of John Wigley and his son Ralph.



John and his wife had the following children:


1. John, married Alice.


*2. Ralph, married Isabel; died 1540.


SOURCE: Cromford Village in Derbyshire.



Early Wigleys:


"The Wigley family takes its name from a hamlet near Old Brampton, four miles from Chesterfield. The first recorded mention of a Wigley in Wirksworth was in 1383 when land was granted to Richard, son of Roger de Wygeleye. In 1451 at Wirksworth manor court, William Alson surrendered a cottage in Wirksworth to the use of John Wigley and Ralph his son." (Cromford Village in Derbyshire)


Lead Mining in Derbyshire:

"The first smelting of Derbyshire lead ore, known as galena, was some 3500 years ago. Two thousand years ago the Romans made it an important industry. By the 1600s lead had become second in importance in the national economy only to wool. It was essential for the roofs of public buildings and the new houses being built in every part of the country by the nobility and gentry. All houses, including farmhouses and cottages by then, had glazed windows, with lead glazing bars. It was the only material for water storage and piping. Even the army used it as ammunition. There was a thriving export trade as well as the home market and the Wirksworth area was the main source of the ore. (Derbyshire UK, http://www.derbyshireuk.net/leadmining5.html)


SOURCE: Cromford Village in Derbyshire; Derbyshire UK - Lead Mining.